Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am looking for an elegant solution to the following problem. I have a task struct that I use for deferred function calls.

template <typename T> struct Task1
{
    T Arg1;
    Delegate<T> TaskDelegate;
};

The problem I'm having is this:

Task1<const Foo&> MyTask;

This will result in the parameter being held as a const reference. Does anyone know a nice solution to get round this? I could enforce rules such as the delegate signature always taking const& params but this seems restrictive. I could always have two task structs (one for ref and one for value) but this seems nasty.

The other solution would be to create the following:

template <typename T1, typename T2> struct Task1
{
    T2 Arg1;
    Delegate<T1> TaskDelegate;
};

Is there anyway to default T2 to be the same type as T1? That way whenever I have a method value signature I don't need to have the additional template params.

EDIT: The template is used for a multithreaded task scheduler. Here is an example:

void MyClass::Populate(const std::string& instrText);

CTaskScheduler::Schedule(Task1<const std::string&>(this, &MyClass::Popluate, "MyString"));
share|improve this question
1  
I'm not sure I understand the problem yet. Could you give an example of how this template is actually used, and why the const ref is an issue? –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 19 '11 at 16:34
    
if you want to remove reference, use std::remove_reference<T> –  Gene Bushuyev Aug 19 '11 at 16:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You could take a look at the implementation of function<> either in boost or the upcoming standard. As a matter of fact, you can just use function<>. I think that the solution there was (before C++0x) to always store a copy of the arguments, if the user wants reference semantics they can use a reference wrapper.

As to how to get to a value, you can take a look at some simple metafunction to remove const or &:

// Remove reference:
template <typename T>
struct remove_reference {
   typedef T type;
};
template <typename T>
struct remove_reference<T&> {
   typedef T type;
};

Similarly for const.

share|improve this answer
    
This is nice, because you don't have tu use the full type traits library from boost to implement this easy and small template. –  Diego Sevilla Aug 19 '11 at 16:40
    
I am actually using the FastDelegate library for my functions throughout the engine so I would prefer not to use both FastDelegate and boost::function. However the small template looks appealing –  Downie Aug 19 '11 at 16:44
    
If your compiler supports either TR1 or C++11, there is a std::remove_reference<T> that does this. –  Mranz Jan 15 '12 at 16:57

You can use the boost.type_traits library to remove the const-ness of the parameter using boost::remove_const.

share|improve this answer
    
Oops, seems like dark_charlie and I wrote at the same time... –  Diego Sevilla Aug 19 '11 at 16:38

In addition to boost::type_traits, there is a boos::call_traits library specifically built to handle problems like this. It also provides mechanisms to avoid the references of references problem.

share|improve this answer

boost::remove_const should help you in this case:

template <typename T> struct Task1
{
    typename boost::remove_const<T>::type Arg1;
    Delegate<T> TaskDelegate;
};

Alternatively, you can avoid using boost if you use template specialization for const types:

template <typename T> struct Task1
{
    T Arg1;
    Delegate<T> TaskDelegate;
};

template <typename T> struct Task1<const T>
{
    T Arg1;
    Delegate<const T> TaskDelegate;
};

(Warning: untested)

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is I have more than one task implementation each taking more parameters which would lead to infinite template specializations depending on which parameters had the const refs –  Downie Aug 19 '11 at 16:47
    
In this case, what I think you should do is to declare all the function<>s you're going to need, depending on the task's signatures. –  Diego Sevilla Aug 19 '11 at 16:54
    
I think that second should have been template <> struct Task1<const T> –  Mooing Duck Aug 19 '11 at 17:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.