Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C, is there a nice way to track the number of elements in an enum? I've seen

enum blah {
    FIRST,
    SECOND,
    THIRD,
    LAST
};

But this only works if the items are sequential and start at zero.

share|improve this question
    
See the question on enum in C++ like enum in Ada. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 23 '13 at 17:58

7 Answers 7

up vote 20 down vote accepted

I don't believe there is. But what would you do with such a number if they are not sequential, and you don't already have a list of them somewhere? And if they are sequential but start at a different number, you could always do:

enum blah {
    FIRST = 128,
    SECOND,
    THIRD,
    END
};
const int blah_count = END - FIRST;
share|improve this answer
    
can enum types be negative? If so watch out with this one. –  ojblass Apr 3 '09 at 3:51
    
FIRST=-2 would still calculate correctly, I think: 1 - (-2) = 3. –  paxdiablo Apr 3 '09 at 3:53
    
No need to watch out; subtraction works just fine for negative numbers. Pax has it right. –  Brian Campbell Apr 3 '09 at 3:59
    
FIRST = -200, SECOND = -199, THIRD = -198, END = -100. -200 - (-100) = bad news –  ojblass Apr 3 '09 at 4:00
6  
No, you would get FIRST = -9 SECOND = -8 THIRD = -7 END = -6, so you'd have -6 - (-9) = -6 + 9 = 3 –  Brian Campbell Apr 3 '09 at 4:18

If you don't assign your enums you can do somethings like this:

enum MyType {
  Type1,
  Type2,
  Type3,
  NumberOfTypes
}

NumberOfTypes will evaluate to 3 which is the number of real types.

share|improve this answer
1  
Good trick! clearly the easiest one for sequencial enums –  João Nunes Jun 30 '14 at 10:21

Unfortunately, no. There is not.

share|improve this answer

Well, since enums can't change at run-time, the best thing you can do is:

enum blah {
    FIRST = 7,
    SECOND = 15,
    THIRD = 9,
    LAST = 12
};
#define blahcount 4 /* counted manually, keep these in sync */

But I find it difficult to envisage a situation where that information would come in handy. What exactly are you trying to do?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes why would you want to do that! –  ojblass Apr 3 '09 at 4:03
    
I have a situation where I want to randomly assign enum values to an array. I need to know how many different values there are so I can get the right range. –  anthropomorphic Jul 19 '12 at 19:43
int enaumVals[] =
{
FIRST,
SECOND,
THIRD,
LAST
};

#define NUM_ENUMS sizeof(enaumVals) / sizeof ( int );
share|improve this answer
3  
This seems to require repeating the entire enum in an array, purely to allow use of sizeof - looks like more effort to me than just #define COUNT 4 –  Peter Gibson Dec 12 '11 at 0:16
    
In C size computes at compilation time. C is not an interpreted language, this method is as efficient as using a fix definition and simplifies maintenance. –  Fulup Apr 3 at 10:55

Old question, I know. This is for the googlers with the same question.

You could use X-Macros

Example:

//The values are defined via a map which calls a given macro which is defined later
#define ENUM_MAP(X) \
      X(VALA, 0)    \
      X(VALB, 10)   \
      X(VALC, 20)

//Using the map for the enum decl
#define X(n, v) [n] = v,
typedef enum val_list {
    ENUM_MAP(X) //results in [VALA] = 0, etc...
} val_list;
#undef X

//For the count of values
#define X(n, v) + 1
int val_list_count = 0 + ENUM_MAP(X); //evaluates to 0 + 1 + 1 + 1
#undef X

This is also transparent to an IDE, so auto-completes will work fine (as its all done in the pre-processor).

share|improve this answer

I know this is a very old question, but as the accepted answer is wrong, I feel compelled to post my own. I'll reuse the accepted answer's example, slightly modified. (Making the assumption that enums are sequential.)

// Incorrect code, do not use!
enum blah {
  FIRST   =  0,
  SECOND, // 1
  THIRD,  // 2
  END     // 3
};
const int blah_count = END - FIRST;
// And this above would be 3 - 0 = 3, although there actually are 4 items.

Any developer knows the reason: count = last - first + 1. And this works with any combination of signs (both ends negative, both positive, or only first end negative). You can try.

// Now, the correct version.
enum blah {
  FIRST   =  0,
  SECOND, // 1
  THIRD,  // 2
  END     // 3
};
const int blah_count = END - FIRST + 1; // 4

Edit: reading the text again, I got a doubt. Is that END meant not to be part of the offered items? That looks weird to me, but well, I guess it could make sense...

share|improve this answer
    
The intention is that there are 3 elements in the enum (FIRST, SECOND & THIRD), with the last being a placeholder that always designates the end of the list, so that if additional items are added it is not necessary to change the formula for the item count. –  Peter Gibson Jan 28 at 1:31
    
Yeah, that's what I thought when I read again a few hours later. Thanks for confirming. A comment next to END that says "Not mean to be used" or something might help understanding the code. –  David Stosik Jan 30 at 7:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.