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Should you consider the use of Properties.Settings.Default within a class as a dependency, and therefore inject it?

e.g.:

public class Foo
{
    private _settings;
    private bool _myBool;

    public Foo(Settings settings)
    {
        this._settings = settings;
        this._myBool = this._settings.MyBool;
    }
}

.
.

or would you consider the use of Settings as an application wide global as good practice?

e.g.:

public class Foo
{
    private bool _myBool;

    public Foo()
    {
        this._myBool = Properties.Settings.Default.MyBool;
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You may want to encapsulate Settings in a class and have an interface for them. This way, where your settings are coming from can be changed for things like unit testing. If you're also using an IoC container, then by all means register the settings with the container.

I do this for the ConfigurationManager and WebConfigurationManager so that I can inject settings for tests. Nathan Gloyn has wrapped the adapters and interface up already in a project that you can use if you also want to do this.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea of an interface, but I'm not sure how to go about implementing that. Do you mean have an interface that has properties that directly map to the ones in Settings, or use the ConfigurationManager, in the same way that the code you linked to does? Not used the ConfigurationManager before, so not too sure what to do here. Another nudge in the right direction would be appreciated. :) – Andy Aug 19 '11 at 19:49
    
The IConfigurationManager was just an example of where external settings may be in an application and you wish them to be handled by the container and injected into classes. For your Settings class, I would be inclined to create an ISettings interface that best matches the public members of Settings; so if you have a ConnectionString property on Settings then make this a property on the interface, etc. – Russ Cam Aug 19 '11 at 20:02
    
Thanks for clarifying, that makes sense. – Andy Aug 19 '11 at 20:08

I would choose "none of the above" and inject the boolean value directly:

public class Foo
{
    private readonly bool _myBool;

    public Foo(bool myBool)
    {
        _myBool = myBool;
    }
}

This decouples Foo from knowledge of any infrastructure that supports the retrieval of the boolean value. Foo has no reason to introduce complexity by depending on a settings object, especially if it contains other unrelated values.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, but note this is a big harder to configure with the DI container. Still probably the best idea, though. – Domenic Aug 20 '11 at 1:22
    
@Domenic: It is definitely worth noting that some DI containers might not enable this as easily as others. I use Autofac, which supports lambda expressions for registrations and thus can easily inject primitive values. – Bryan Watts Aug 20 '11 at 1:33
    
@Bryan: I agree, but my code snippets above were contrived as an overly simple example for the purposes of the question. However, what you state is right, so thanks for your answer. – Andy Aug 20 '11 at 12:52

They should be passed in as a dependency. Imagine the scenario when you want to change that set of settings via Unit Test in your example #2 - you would have to have some kind of complicated switch logic in the static property getter to accomdate that.

Many IoC containers can even provide a singleton implementation when injecting classes like that to assist you.

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