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Let's say I have got the following class:

class Test
{
    function __construct()
    {
        // initialize some variable

        $this->run();
    }

    function run()
    {
        // do some stuff

        $this->handle();
    }

    function handle()
    {
    }
}

Normally I would create an instance like:

$test = new Test();

However I don't really need the $test anywhere since the functions in the class do all the work once and after that I won't need the instance of the class anymore.

What should I do in this situation or should I just do: $test = new Test();

I hope it makes sense what I'm trying to say if not please tell me.

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5 Answers

They should probably be static functions, if they don't require an instantiated instance:

class Test
{
    private static $var1;
    private static $var2;

    // Constructor is not used to call `run()`, 
    // though you may need it for other purposes if this class
    // has non-static methods and properties.

    // If all properties are used and discarded, they can be
    // created with an init() function
    private static function init() {
        self::$var1 = 'val1';
        self::$var2 = 'val2';
    }

    // And destroyed with a destroy() function


    // Make sure run() is a public method
    public static function run()
    {
        // Initialize
        self::init();

        // access properties
        echo self::$var1;

        // handle() is called statically
        self::handle();

        // If all done, eliminate the variables
        self::$var1 = NULL;
        self::$var2 = NULL;
    }

    // handle() may be a private method.
    private static function handle()
    {
    }
}

// called without a constructor:
Test::run();
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I thought so too. However where / how should I initilize the variable which now takes place in the constructor. (PS the variables should be accessible by the other functions in the class) –  PeeHaa Aug 19 '11 at 18:09
1  
@PeeHaa see additions above. Static properties are initialized in an init() method, and set to NULL after calling handle(). Could also remove them inside handle() –  Michael Berkowski Aug 19 '11 at 18:14
    
great! thanks. Why do you eliminate the variables after finish? –  PeeHaa Aug 19 '11 at 18:17
1  
@PeeHaa since the vars are static, they're shared by all instances of class Test and may hang around in memory for the script execution. If you won't do this more than once on a page, don't worry about destroying them. –  Michael Berkowski Aug 19 '11 at 18:19
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If you don't need it, just do:

new Test();
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You can just call it like this (new Test()).functionHere(). Alternativly you could just make the function static and do Test::functionHere()

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(new Test()).functionHere() never seen this style before. What is it called so I can look it up in the docs. –  PeeHaa Aug 19 '11 at 18:22
    
I don't know if it has an official name but you are basically creating the object without referencing it. As new Test() returns a new Test object which is imidatly ready for use. So by wrapping it in () you can imidatly use the object's methods –  secretformula Aug 19 '11 at 18:25
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None of those is required. Even if you keep the $test variable that won't change anything because it won't take even a 0,001% of the RAM memory. Just continue the program's flow. The best answer from the above is to initiate the class without saving an instance in a variable. Bet even if you do that won't change anything. If I were you, I was going to leave that variable, because later I if I add another function which needs to be called manually that would be the easiest way to call it.

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/@Itehnological something more damn you name is too long: It's not really the performance / RAM I worried about. Just wanted to know what would be best practise in this case. Thanks for yor answer though :) –  PeeHaa Aug 19 '11 at 18:19
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Assigning a value is not required, it will work as

new Test;

Alternativly, you can write your class in static format:

class Test
{
  public static function run()
  {
    // do some stuff
    self::handle();
  }

  public static function handle()
  {
  }
}

And call your class as:

Test::run();
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