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I know these 3 concepts.

But I remember there was another definition: Say a base class has 2 virtual methods: Foo() and Foo(int a). Is there any rule that when a derived class overrides Foo(int a) has to override all other overloads of Foo ?

Was it in Java? I believe it dosn't exist in C#.

Thanks

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7 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

C++:

What you are referring to is name hiding in C++. When you have a class with overrided methods, and you extend this class an override one of the overrided methods, you need to override all the overloaded methods. If not, calls to non-overridden overloaded in the extended class won't work.

For example:

class Base {
    public:
        virtual void A (int);
        virtual void A (int, int);
};
void Base::A(int i) {
    std::cout << “Hi\n”;
}
void Base::A (int i, int j) {
    std::cout << “Bye!!\n”;
}

Suppose you only override one of the methods:

class Sub: public Base {
    public:
        void A(int);
};
void Sub::A(int i) {
    std::cout << “Hey, La!\n”;
}
void main () {
    Sub a;
    a.A(1);
    a.A(1, 1);//won't compile
}

The second call won’t work, as A(int, int) is not visible. This is name hiding. If you want to circumvent this, you can use the using keyword as follows:

class Sub: public Base {
    public:
        void A(int);
        using Base::A;
};
void Sub::A(int i) {
    std::cout << “Hey, La!\n”;
}
void main () {
    Sub a;
    a.A(1);
    a.A(1, 1);//will compile
}

Java:

Java doesn't have such a concept though. You can try this out yourself. Note that all Java methods are virtual by default as per virtual C++ methods.

public class Base {
    public void A() {
        System.out.println("Hi");
    }
    public void A(int i, int j) {
        System.out.println("Bye");
    }
}

public class Sub extends Base {
    public void A() {
        System.out.println("Hey, La!");
    }
}

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Sub a = new Sub();
        a.A();
        a.A(1, 1);//perfectly fine
    }
}

Aside:

I hope you're not referring to extending an abstract class- if you extend an abstract class, you need to override all abstract methods else your class has to be declared abstract.

All methods of an implemented interface need to be implemented though.

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You can use a using statement in C++ to resolve add the unoverriden methods without having to override them. –  Michael Krussel Aug 19 '11 at 20:39
    
So name-hiding in possible only in cpp and not in c# nor java? How would you reploy to Chris Thompson answer? cpp in OO langauge. –  Elad Benda Aug 20 '11 at 9:35
    
Found this great link: ikriv.com/en/prog/info/dotnet/Overloading.html –  Elad Benda Aug 20 '11 at 10:00
    
@Elad Java does not have such a rule. Chris is correct- such a rule is indeed limiting. However, in C++, you can use the using statement to resolve the unoverridden method, as Michael has stated. –  Dhruv Gairola Aug 20 '11 at 11:14
    
@Elad check out my updated answer for more information. –  Dhruv Gairola Aug 20 '11 at 11:39
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No, there is no such rule, at least not in Java. Such a rule would be incredibly limiting as sometimes a subclass only has a new implementation of one of those overloads, etc.

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"Such a rule would be incredibly limiting" - I agree, but it exists in cpp. See Dhruv Gairola answer. –  Elad Benda Aug 20 '11 at 9:35
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This is not a rule in Java. Were you thinking of an interface? If a class implements an interface it must have an implementation of each method declared on the interface.

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1  
+1 for being faster than me of pointing out about interfaces! –  Saher Aug 19 '11 at 18:48
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No Actually that does not apply in Java. However if you implement an interface, then you need to have implementation for all methods in it. But when you are using extends i.e inheritance, then you override the methods you want, and in this case the Foo(int x) is different from the Foo() regardless if their return types are the same or not.

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+1 for thinking along the same lines –  Kevin Bowersox Aug 19 '11 at 18:49
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However if you want to create non-abstract class (extending a base class), you have to implement all abstract methods.

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just to add to what others have already said, in java each method is identified distinctly using its full signature which includes its return type, name and arguments. so when you define a abstract method(virtual function) you define it as abstract only for that function with its signature.

anyhow you could have tried this in ur IDE for fun and would have got the answer in a minute. :P

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