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I'm trying to use csplit command to split a file by 3 strings delimiters, but I'm running into problems. I didn't get cplist to work with a list of delimiters. This is what I'm trying out:

I have this file:

 TRANSHEADER002_XA
 XAL1
 XAL2
 XAL3
 TRANSHEADER001_EXEC
 EXECL1
 EXECL2
 EXECL3
 TRANSHEADER003_YB
 YBL1
 YBL2
 YBL3
 TRANSHEADER002_XA
 XAL1A
 XAL2A
 XAL3A

These are the strings delimiters

 TRANSHEADER002_XA
 TRANSHEADER001_EXEC
 TRANSHEADER003_YB

but I don't get success when I try yo use csplit command with more than 1 delimiter as follows

 csplit -k -s -f "$file"_split. "$file" "/^\(TRANSHEADER002_XA\|TRANSHEADER001_EXEC\|TRANSHEADER003_YB\)/" "{999}"
 csplit -k -s -f "$file"_split. "$file" "/^(TRANSHEADER002_XA|TRANSHEADER001_EXEC|TRANSHEADER003_YB)/" "{999}"
 csplit -k -s -f "$file"_split. "$file" "/^TRANSHEADER002_XA|^TRANSHEADER001_EXEC|^TRANSHEADER003_YB/" "{999}"

I got an "out of range" error like below for any of the commands above

 /^\(TRANSHEADER002_XA\|TRANSHEADER001_EXEC\|TRANSHEADER003_YB\)/ - out of range

I want to split that file like below

 --> file_split.01
 TRANSHEADER002_XA
 XAL1
 XAL2
 XAL3

 --> file_split.02
 TRANSHEADER001_EXEC
 EXECL1
 EXECL2
 EXECL3

 --> file_split.03
 TRANSHEADER003_YB
 YBL1
 YBL2
 YBL3

 --> file_split.04
 TRANSHEADER002_XA
 XAL1A
 XAL2A
 XAL3A

Do you guys know how I could do that by using csplit or by using another command that would gave me the split files like I showed above?

Thank you very much!

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2 Answers 2

You should not repeat the pattern 999 times, but use an option designed to repeat it as many times as necessary: {*}:

csplit -kszf "$file"_split. "$file" "/^TRANSHEADER002_XA\|TRANSHEADER001_EXEC\|TRANSHEADER003_YB/" "{*}"

Also use the -z option to remove empty output files.

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I got "csplit: Illegal repeat count: {*}" and "csplit: illegal option -- z" then I tried this way for example file above: csplit -ksf "$file"_split. "$file" "/^TRANSHEADER002_XA\|TRANSHEADER001_EXEC\|TRANSHEADER003_YB/" "{3}" and csplit -ksf "$file"_split. "$file" "/^TRANSHEADER002_XA|TRANSHEADER001_EXEC|TRANSHEADER003_YB/" "{3}" both failed with same out of range csplit: /^TRANSHEADERIBMAPU001_NA\|TRANSHEADERIBMAPU002_EMEA\|TRANSHEADERIBMAPU003_AP/ - out of range –  Jose Aug 19 '11 at 20:07

With your sample file this worked for me:

csplit -zksf file_split. csplit.test.txt '/^TRANSHEADER\(002_XA\|001_EXEC\|003_YB\)/' '{*}'

Using {*} eliminates the out-of-range error because it matches as many times as it can, rather than trying exactly 999 times.

I also reduced your regex, but that's beside the point.

(I see Michal beat me to this)

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Didn't work for me. I got following error csplit: /^TRANSHEADER(002_XA\|001_EXEC\|003_YB)/ - out of range –  Jose Aug 19 '11 at 20:25
    
@Jose - I did this with csplit (GNU coreutils) 5.97 -- found by running csplit --version -- what version are you using, on what flavour of Unix? –  Stephen P Aug 19 '11 at 21:27
    
In fact, you might not even have the --version arg available if you're not on Linux. –  Stephen P Aug 19 '11 at 21:29

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