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As arguments to my script there are some file paths. Those can, of course, be relative (or contain ~). But for the functions I've written I need paths that are absolute, but do not have their symlinks resolved.

Is there any function for this?

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Try the readlink function - andy.wordpress.com/2008/05/09/bash-equivalent-for-php-realpath –  arunkumar Aug 19 '11 at 19:42
3  
readlink resolves symlinks; the OP doesn't want that. –  Keith Thompson Aug 19 '11 at 19:54
    
possible duplicate of Converting relative path into absolute path –  tripleee Apr 28 '13 at 6:32
    
possible duplicate of bash/fish command to print absolute path to a file –  Trevor Boyd Smith May 5 at 16:16

7 Answers 7

MY_PATH=$(readlink -f $YOUR_ARG) will resolve relative paths like "./" and "../"

Consider this as well (source):

#!/bin/bash
dir_resolve()
{
cd "$1" 2>/dev/null || return $?  # cd to desired directory; if fail, quell any error messages but return exit status
echo "`pwd -P`" # output full, link-resolved path
}

# sample usage
if abs_path="`dir_resolve \"$1\"`"
then
echo "$1 resolves to $abs_path"
echo pwd: `pwd` # function forks subshell, so working directory outside function is not affected
else
echo "Could not reach $1"
fi
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that certainly nice, but the problem is that simlinks are resolved, and that would lead to some confusion with the users. –  laar Aug 19 '11 at 20:18
    
man pwd: "-P Display the physical current working directory (all symbolic links resolved)", just remove the -P –  andsens Jun 12 '13 at 22:01
4  
Sadly, readlink on OS X doesn't support -f. –  Rob Howard Jan 24 '14 at 5:45
1  
To get the readlink -f functionality on OS X, you can use Homebrew and then run: $ brew install coreutils You can then use greadlink -f . –  jgpawletko Jun 3 at 16:40

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/programming-9/bash-script-return-full-path-and-filename-680368/page3.html has the following

function abspath {
    if [[ -d "$1" ]]
    then
        pushd "$1" >/dev/null
        pwd
        popd >/dev/null
    elif [[ -e $1 ]]
    then
        pushd "$(dirname "$1")" >/dev/null
        echo "$(pwd)/$(basename "$1")"
        popd >/dev/null
    else
        echo "$1" does not exist! >&2
        return 127
    fi
}

which uses pushd/popd to get into a state where pwd is useful.

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1  
Sadly, this is really the best answer on here and it's not voted up to where it belongs. +1 for accurately answering the OP's question. He wants symlinks not resolved, which is really a question of bash's local DIRSTACK and nothing else. Nice solution! –  cptstubing06 Mar 14 '13 at 4:29
2  
When aiming for standard sh compatibility, pushd; cd <dir>; <cmd>; popd can be replaced with (cd <dir>; <cmd>). –  Abbafei Jun 27 '13 at 9:46
    
@Abafei, good point re subshells. –  Mike Samuel Jun 27 '13 at 15:09

Simple one-liner:

function abs_path {
  (cd "$(dirname '$1')" &>/dev/null && printf "%s/%s" "$PWD" "${1##*/}")
}

Usage:

function do_something {
    local file=$(abs_path $1)
    printf "Absolute path to %s: %s\n" "$1" "$file"
}
do_something $HOME/path/to/some\ where

I am still trying to figure out how I can get it to be completely oblivious to whether the path exists or not (so it can be used when creating files as well).

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1  
Won't this change the current working directory? Should I cd - afterward to reset it? –  devios Nov 20 '13 at 18:26
3  
No need. Note the parens, they cause the commands inside to be run in a subshell. The state (e.g. the working directory) of a subshell does not leak to its parent shell. Read more here: tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/subshells.html –  andsens Nov 21 '13 at 20:22
1  
Nice one-liner. There's an issue, though: if the expanded value of $1 does not have any slash (i.e. it is a file name in the current directory), then ${1%/*} expands to the filename itself and the cd command fails. You may want to use $(dirname $1) instead, which will expand to '.' in that case. –  Paulo Sep 1 '14 at 12:43
    
You're right, updated. I have some quoting problems with replacing ${1##*/} with basename though, without putting it in a separate variable, paths with spaces don't work properly. –  andsens Sep 2 '14 at 8:51
    
Why "$(pwd)" instead of "$PWD", saving a subshell-invocation? (Not criticising; genuinely asking. Are there issues with $PWD?) –  ELLIOTTCABLE Apr 7 at 11:21

on OS X you can use

stat -f "%N" YOUR_PATH

on linux you might have realpath executable. if not, the following might work (not only for links):

readlink -c YOUR_PATH
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4  
on Linux (with coreutils 8.20) it's readlink -f YOUR_PATH –  frogstarr78 Jan 12 '13 at 20:41
4  
The OS X answer does not work. stat -f "%N" PATH gives me exactly the same path I gave it. –  Kevin Ballard Oct 16 '14 at 1:36

Do you have to use bash exclusively? I needed to do this and got fed up with differences between Linux and OS X. So I used PHP for a quick and dirty solution.

#!/usr/bin/php <-- or wherever
<?php
{
   if($argc!=2)
      exit();
   $fname=$argv[1];
   if(!file_exists($fname))
      exit();
   echo realpath($fname)."\n";
}
?>

I know it's not a very elegant solution but it does work.

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Maybe this is more readable and does not use a subshell and does not change the current dir:

dir_resolve() {
  local dir=`dirname "$1"`
  local file=`basename "$1"`
  pushd "$dir" &>/dev/null || return $? # On error, return error code
  echo "`pwd -P`/$file" # output full, link-resolved path with filename
  popd &> /dev/null
}
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self edit, I just noticed the OP said he's not looking for symlinks resolved:

"But for the functions I've written I need paths that are absolute, but do not have their symlinks resolved."

So guess this isn't so apropos to his question after all. :)

Since I've run into this many times over the years, and this time around I needed a pure bash portable version that I could use on OSX and linux, I went ahead and wrote one:

The living version lives here:

https://github.com/keen99/shell-functions/tree/master/resolve_path

but for the sake of SO, here's the current version (I feel it's well tested..but I'm open to feedback!)

Might not be difficult to make it work for plain bourne shell (sh), but I didn't try...I like $FUNCNAME too much. :)

#!/bin/bash

resolve_path() {
    #I'm bash only, please!
    # usage:  resolve_path <a file or directory> 
    # follows symlinks and relative paths, returns a full real path
    #
    local owd="$PWD"
    #echo "$FUNCNAME for $1" >&2
    local opath="$1"
    local npath=""
    local obase=$(basename "$opath")
    local odir=$(dirname "$opath")
    if [[ -L "$opath" ]]
    then
    #it's a link.
    #file or directory, we want to cd into it's dir
        cd $odir
    #then extract where the link points.
        npath=$(readlink "$obase")
        #have to -L BEFORE we -f, because -f includes -L :(
        if [[ -L $npath ]]
         then
        #the link points to another symlink, so go follow that.
            resolve_path "$npath"
            #and finish out early, we're done.
            return $?
            #done
        elif [[ -f $npath ]]
        #the link points to a file.
         then
            #get the dir for the new file
            nbase=$(basename $npath)
            npath=$(dirname $npath)
            cd "$npath"
            ndir=$(pwd -P)
            retval=0
            #done
        elif [[ -d $npath ]]
         then
        #the link points to a directory.
            cd "$npath"
            ndir=$(pwd -P)
            retval=0
            #done
        else
            echo "$FUNCNAME: ERROR: unknown condition inside link!!" >&2
            echo "opath [[ $opath ]]" >&2
            echo "npath [[ $npath ]]" >&2
            return 1
        fi
    else
        if ! [[ -e "$opath" ]]
         then
            echo "$FUNCNAME: $opath: No such file or directory" >&2
            return 1
            #and break early
        elif [[ -d "$opath" ]]
         then 
            cd "$opath"
            ndir=$(pwd -P)
            retval=0
            #done
        elif [[ -f "$opath" ]]
         then
            cd $odir
            ndir=$(pwd -P)
            nbase=$(basename "$opath")
            retval=0
            #done
        else
            echo "$FUNCNAME: ERROR: unknown condition outside link!!" >&2
            echo "opath [[ $opath ]]" >&2
            return 1
        fi
    fi
    #now assemble our output
    echo -n "$ndir"
    if [[ "x${nbase:=}" != "x" ]]
     then
        echo "/$nbase"
    else 
        echo
    fi
    #now return to where we were
    cd "$owd"
    return $retval
}

here's a classic example, thanks to brew:

%% ls -l `which mvn`
lrwxr-xr-x  1 draistrick  502  29 Dec 17 10:50 /usr/local/bin/mvn@ -> ../Cellar/maven/3.2.3/bin/mvn

use this function and it will return the -real- path:

%% cat test.sh
#!/bin/bash
. resolve_path.inc
echo
echo "relative symlinked path:"
which mvn
echo
echo "and the real path:"
resolve_path `which mvn`


%% test.sh

relative symlinked path:
/usr/local/bin/mvn

and the real path:
/usr/local/Cellar/maven/3.2.3/libexec/bin/mvn
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