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I believe this is how you would normally sort a hash by value:

foreach my $key (sort { $hash{$a} <=> $hash{$b} } (keys %hash) ) {
    print "$key=>$hash{$key}";
}

This would print out the values smallest to largest.

Now, what if I have a hash like this:

$hash{$somekey}{$somekey2}{$thirdkey}

How could I sort by values and get all the keys as well?

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So you want to sort irregardless of depth within the structure? –  DavidO Aug 19 '11 at 20:41
    
There is a fixed depth of 3 keys in this hash, and I want to sort the hash by the value of all triplets of keys that exist. –  petranaya Aug 19 '11 at 20:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would just create a new hash:

my %new;
for my $k1 (keys %hash) {
  for my $k2 (keys %{$hash{$k1}}) {
    for my $k3 (keys %{$hash{$k1}{$k2}}) {
      $new{$k1,$k2,$k3} = $hash{$k1}{$k2}{$k3};
    }
  }
}

my @ordered = sort { $new{$a} <=> $new{$b} } keys %new;
for my $k (@ordered) {
  my @keys = split($;, $k);
  print "key: @k      - value: $new{$k}\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I just ended up using this. –  petranaya Aug 19 '11 at 21:24
2  
Beware that $; has to be a value that never appears in your keys (it defaults to "\x1c", a control character), or else this code will crash and burn. –  hobbs Aug 19 '11 at 22:04
    
@FMc - thanks! post corrected. –  user5402 Aug 19 '11 at 23:27
    
wow, I learned something new, $; is an interesting one! –  Joel Berger Aug 20 '11 at 0:17

I have done something similar by moving a reference down to the appropriate hash key. You can then perform the sort on the pointer.

The advantage to doing it this way is that it is easy to adjust if the level changes.

What I have used this methodology for is systematically moving the pointer to a specific level by referencing an array of keys. (Ex: my @Keys = ('Value', 'Value2');)

I believe a derivative of the following example might give you what you are looking for.

my $list_ref;
my $pointer;

my %list = (
   Value => {
      Value2 => {
         A => '1',
         C => '3',
         B => '2',
      },
   },
);

$list_ref = \%list;
$pointer = $list_ref->{Value}->{Value2};

foreach my $key (sort { $pointer->{$a} <=> $pointer->{$b} } (keys %{$pointer})) {
   print "Key: $key\n";
}
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For academic purposes, here's a fairly tidy recursive function:

sub flatten_hash {
  my ($hash, $path) = @_;
  $path = [] unless defined $path;

  my @ret;

  while (my ($key, $value) = each %$hash) {
    if (ref $value eq 'HASH') {
      push @ret, flatten_hash($value, [ @$path, $key ]);
    } else {
      push @ret, [ [ @$path, $key ], $value ];
    }
  }

  return @ret;
}

which takes a hash like

{
    roman => {
        i => 1,
        ii => 2,
        iii => 3,
    },
    english => {
        one => 1,
        two => 2,
        three => 3,
    },
}

and turns it into a list like

(
    [ ['roman','i'], 1 ],
    [ ['roman', 'ii'], 2 ],
    [ ['roman', 'iii'], 3 ],
    [ ['english', 'one'], 1 ],
    [ ['english', 'two'], 2 ],
    [ ['english', 'three'], 3 ]
)

although of course the order is bound to vary. Given that list, you can sort it on { $a->[1] <=> $b->[1] } or similar, and then extract the key path from @{ $entry->[0] } for each entry. It works regardless of the depth of the data structure, and even if the leaf nodes don't occur all at the same depth. It needs a little bit of extension to deal with structures that aren't purely of hashrefs and plain scalars, though.

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Here's a way to do it using Deep::Hash::Utils.

use Deep::Hash::Utils qw(slurp);

my %h = (
    A => {
        Aa => { Aaa => 4, Aab => 5 },
        Ab => { Aba => 1 },
        Ac => { Aca => 2, Acb => 9, Acc => 0 },
    },
    B => {
        Ba => { Baa => 44, Bab => -55 },
        Bc => { Bca => 22, Bcb => 99, Bcc => 100 },
    },
);

my @all_keys_and_vals = slurp \%h;
print "@$_\n" for sort { $a->[-1] <=> $b->[-1] } @all_keys_and_vals;

Output:

B Ba Bab -55
A Ac Acc 0
A Ab Aba 1
A Ac Aca 2
A Aa Aaa 4
A Aa Aab 5
A Ac Acb 9
B Bc Bca 22
B Ba Baa 44
B Bc Bcb 99
B Bc Bcc 100
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