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I'm trying to write a prime generator that implements the sieve of Eratosthenes. However, it includes some composite numbers (such as 25, 49 and other multiples of 5 and 7) in the output.

Here's my code:

/*****
 * To find out prime numbers from 1 to 100 with a different procedure
 * Author:Udit Gupta
 * Date:20/08/2011
 */

#include<stdio.h>

int main() {
    int a[100],i,j,k,n;

    for(i=0;i<=99;i++)
        a[i] = i+1;  /*1 to 100 numbers are entered into array*/

    /*Here te actual logic starts .......*/
    j = 1;
    while ( (a[j] != 0) && (j!=50) ) {
        k = 1;
        n = a[j];

        while( (n * k) < 99) {
            a[j+(n*k)] = 0;
            k++;
        }

        j++;
    }

    /*To print output of the array*/
    for (i=0;i<=99;i++) {
        if ( a[i] != 0)
            printf("\n%d",a[i]);
    }

    return 0;
}

Here is the output ....

    
udit@udit-Dabba ~/Desktop/letusc/ch8 $ gcc -o Dd Dd.c -Wall
udit@udit-Dabba ~/Desktop/letusc/ch8 $ ./Dd

1 2 3 5 7 11 13 17 19 23 25 29 31 35 37 41 43 47 49 53 55 59 61 65 67 71 73 77 79 83 85 89 91 95 97

share|improve this question
    
1 isn't a prime number, by the way... –  DNA Aug 19 '11 at 21:50
    
have you tried using a debugger –  pm100 Aug 19 '11 at 21:51
2  
Why don't you try debugging your code to find out? –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 19 '11 at 21:52
    
@MByD: 25 is not prime. –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 19 '11 at 21:52
    
@MByD: I think the problem is 1, 25, 35, 49, 55, 65, 77, 85, 91 and 95. –  Omri Barel Aug 19 '11 at 21:53

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1st hint: in a debugger, break on the n = a[j]; line. Run a few iterations. Does it ever stop when a[j] == 5?

udit@udit-Dabba ~/Desktop/letusc/ch8 $ gdb ./Dd
[GDB preamble elided]
(gdb) b main
Breakpoint 1 at 0x100000e63: file Dd.c, line 12.
(gdb) r
Starting program: /home/udit/Desktop/letusc/ch8/Dd
Reading symbols for shared libraries +. done

Breakpoint 1, main () at Dd.c:12
12      for(i=0;i<=99;i++)
(gdb) watch n
Hardware watchpoint 2: n
(gdb) c
Continuing.
Hardware watchpoint 2: n

Old value = 0
New value = 2
main () at Dd.c:21
21          while( (n * k) < 99) {
(gdb) c
Continuing.
Hardware watchpoint 2: n

Old value = 2
New value = 3
main () at Dd.c:21
21          while( (n * k) < 99) {
(gdb) p j
$1 = 2
(gdb) 

RMS's (no relation to that RMS) GDB tutorial includes a section on watchpoints, which the sample session above makes use of.

More hints to follow, as you need them.

share|improve this answer
    
I am very new to programming and linux also pleas help me out how to debug the code on linux machine ?? –  Udit Gupta Aug 19 '11 at 22:10
    
A guide would be best. Try Linux software debugging with GDB, or search the web if that doesn't work for you. Short version: gdb *executable* to start gdb, b (*function name*|*line number*) to set a breakpoint, r to start the program running, c to continue after a breakpoint (until the next breakpoint), p *expr* to print the value of an expression (such as a variable name), s to step through a line. See GDB Cheat Sheet for more info on commands. –  outis Aug 19 '11 at 22:17
    
It never reaches n = 5. It stops far too early. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 19 '11 at 22:26
    
Thanks a lot.. I will try to work on debugging and got clear here...Its never executing for n=5 –  Udit Gupta Aug 19 '11 at 22:32
while (n * k < 99) {
  a[j + n * k] = 0;
  k++;
}

This code is dangerous. You may well end up with j + n * k being larger than 99, which will overwrite arbitrary memory (or, strictly speaking, the behavior is undefined). Better be safe:

#include <assert.h>

...

while (n * k < 99) {
  int index = j + n * k;
  assert(0 <= index && index < 100);
  a[index] = 0;
  k++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
An index of < 0 is rather unlikely, isn't it? –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 19 '11 at 22:22
    
Alternatively (or additionally), change the condition to check that the index is in range: while (j + n * k < LENGTH(a)), given a suitable definition for LENGTH. –  outis Aug 19 '11 at 22:23
1  
@Rudy: asserts often test "impossible" scenarios, just in case. –  outis Aug 19 '11 at 22:23
    
@outis: Hey, that's what Udit should find out himself. ;) –  Roland Illig Aug 19 '11 at 22:25
    
@Roland: He wouldn't have found out, because that is not the problem with his loop. –  Rudy Velthuis Aug 19 '11 at 22:39

Honestly, do yourself a favor and do a web search on "tutorial on gdb debugger". You'll get hundreds of hits. Then, sit down and have some fun learning a powerful tool that you will spend hundreds and hundreds of hours using if you continue to learn C, C++, or a dozen other computer languages. (I'm serious about the 'fun' part; I you don't find it fun, drop CS!)

Also do a search on 'ddd debugger'; this is a free OSS graphical front-end to gdb -- very nice, IMHO.

-k

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, running code line-by-line in gdb is fun. Often the problem line (or transition between lines) can just "jump out" at you. You may not instantly know what's wrong and how to fix it; but you can "sense" that something fishy just happened. Knowing where it's going wrong makes it easy to begin investigating why. –  luser droog Aug 20 '11 at 6:13

You are storing your results (marking non-primes as zero) in the same array as you are reading from within the outer loop.

The number 4 gets (correctly) marked as non-prime, but this has the unwanted side-effect of terminiating your main loop (because a[j] ==0).

So you only process n=2 and n=3.

share|improve this answer

The problem is that the loop ends far too soon. if a == 3, a[j] == 0 and the loop ends. Change your main loop to:

for (j = 1; j < 50; j++) 
{
    k = 1;
    n = a[j];

    if (n != 0) 
        while (j + n * k <= 99) 
        {
            a[j + n * k] = 0;
            k++;
        }
}
share|improve this answer

hint ; look at what happened to 5 and hence 25

google will tell you how to use gdb - its not hard

a[j + n * k] = 0;

I think you mean

a[n * k] = 0;
share|improve this answer
    
help me out how to debug on linux machine with gcc ?????? –  Udit Gupta Aug 19 '11 at 21:58
    
I think its fine for 5... I m not able to find out the error.. –  Udit Gupta Aug 19 '11 at 21:59
    
j=4 so n=a[4]=5 and then for j=4,4+5*1,4+5*2,etc it will go and will make them zero. 25 is a[24] and 24 = 4+5*4 –  Udit Gupta Aug 19 '11 at 22:02
    
@Udit: Try to observe that happening in a debugger. –  outis Aug 19 '11 at 22:04

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