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I thought I understood Perl RE to a reasonable extent, but this is puzzling me:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $test = "'some random string'";

if($test =~ /\'?(.*?)\'?/) {
       print "Captured $1\n";
       print "Matched $&";
}
else {
       print "What?!!";
}

prints

Captured
Matched '

It seems it has matched the ending ' alone, and so captured nothing.
I would have expected it to match the entire thing, or if it's totally non-greedy, nothing at all (as everything there is an optional match).
This in between behaviour baffles me, can anyone explain what is happening?

share|improve this question
up vote 13 down vote accepted

The \'? at the beginning and end means match 0 or 1 apostrophes greedily. (As another poster has pointed out, to make it non-greedy, it would have to be \'??)

The .*? in the middle means match 0 or more characters non-greedily.

The Perl regular expression engine will look at the first part of the string. It will match the beginning, but does so greedily, so it picks up the first apostrophe. It then matches non-greedily (so takes as little as it can) followed by an optional apostrophe. This is matched by the empty string.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the very clear explanation. – sundar Apr 3 '09 at 8:31
2  
In other words, only the beginning apostrophe was matched, the rest of the regex matches the empty string. – user55400 Apr 6 '09 at 10:27

I think you mean something like:

/'(.*?)'/      // matches everything in single quotes

or

/'[^']*'/      // matches everything in single quotes, but faster

The singe quotes don't need to be escaped, AFAIK.

share|improve this answer

pattern? is greedy, if you want it to be non-greedy you must say pattern??:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $test = "'some random string'";

if($test =~ /\'?(.*?)\'?/) {
       print "Captured [$1]\n";
       print "Matched  [$&]\n";
}
if($test =~ /\'??(.*?)\'??/) {
       print "Captured [$1]\n";
       print "Matched  [$&]\n";
}

from perldoc perlre:

The following standard quantifiers are recognized:

*      Match 0 or more times
+      Match 1 or more times
?      Match 1 or 0 times
{n}    Match exactly n times
{n,}   Match at least n times
{n,m}  Match at least n but not more than m times

By default, a quantified subpattern is "greedy", that is, it will match as many times as possible (given a particular starting location) while still allowing the rest of the pattern to match. If you want it to match the minimum number of times possible, follow the quantifier with a "?". Note that the meanings don’t change, just the "greediness":

*?     Match 0 or more times
+?     Match 1 or more times
??     Match 0 or 1 time
{n}?   Match exactly n times
{n,}?  Match at least n times
{n,m}? Match at least n but not more than m times
share|improve this answer
    
Nope, perl regex is greedy by default and ? makes them non-greedy. – Ed Guiness Apr 3 '09 at 7:59
3  
Um, read what I said again, pattern? is greedy (because that is the default), to get non-greedy you must say pattern??. – Chas. Owens Apr 3 '09 at 8:03
    
From the perldoc you quoted: If you want it to match the minimum number of times possible, follow the quantifier with a "?". – Ed Guiness Apr 3 '09 at 8:09
4  
yes, you must follow the quantifier with ?. The pattern is not the quantifier. The quantifier in this case is ? which is the same as the {0,1} quantifier. To get non-greedy optional matches you must say pattern??, that is pattern, quantifier (in this case ?), and then non-greedy ?. – Chas. Owens Apr 3 '09 at 8:13
    
It is right there in the freaking perldoc I quoted, forth line from the bottom! – Chas. Owens Apr 3 '09 at 8:14

Beware of making all elements of your regex optional (i.e. having all elements quantified with * or ? ). This lets the Perl regex engine match as much as it wants (even nothing), while still considering the match successful.

I suspect what you want is

/'(.*?)'/
share|improve this answer

I would say the closest answer to what you are looking for is

/'?([^']*)'?/

So "get the single quote if it's there", "get anything and everything that's not a single quote", "get the last single quote if it's there".

Unless you want to match "'don't do this'" - but who uses an apostrophe in a single quote anyway (and gets away with it for long)? :)

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