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So i'm following the intro to java 6.092 course @ mit ocw. I'm on lesson two, but nothing I try seems to make the program work right.

i even noticed that the version of my code provided in the lesson 2 review at the beginning of lesson 3 has a similar problem. [edit]- the code from the lesson was incomplete cause i forgot to add a variable.

An employee gets paid (hours worked) × (base pay), for each hour up to 40 hours.
For every hour over 40, they get overtime = (base pay) × 1.5.
The base pay must not be less than the minimum wage ($8.00 an hour).
If it is, print an error. If the number of hours is greater than 60, print an error message.

Here is my try for a solution:

public static void main(String[] arguments) {
    int startOT = 40; 
    int maxH = 60;
    double otPay = 1.5;
    int emp1Hours = 35, emp2Hours = 47, emp3Hours = 73;
    double emp1Pay = 7.50, emp2Pay = 8.20, emp3Pay = 10.00;

    double swer;
    if (emp1Hours > startOT){
        swer = emp1Pay * startOT + (emp1Pay * otPay) * (emp1Hours - startOT);
        System.out.println("Employee John Doe makes " + "$" + swer + " this week!");
    }else if (emp1Hours > maxH){
        System.out.println("@John Doe ERROR! Hours worked is invalid!");
    }
    else if (emp1Pay < 8){
        System.out.println("Invalid hourly pay ;(");
    }
    else {
        swer = emp1Pay * emp1Hours;
        System.out.println("Employee John Doe makes " + "$" + swer + " this week!");
    }

    double swerzie;
    if (emp2Hours > startOT){
        swerzie = emp2Pay * startOT + (emp2Pay * otPay) * (emp2Hours - startOT);
        System.out.println("Employee Jane Doe makes " + "$" + swerzie + " this week!");
    }else if (emp2Hours > maxH){
        System.out.println("@Jane Doe ERROR! Hours worked is invalid!");
    }
    else if (emp2Pay < 8){
         System.out.println("Invalid hourly pay ;(");
    }
    else {
        swerzie = emp2Pay * emp2Hours;
        System.out.println("Employee Jane Doe makes " + "$" + swerzie + " this week!");
    }

    double answer;
    if (emp3Hours > startOT){
        answer = emp3Pay * startOT + (emp3Pay * otPay) * (emp3Hours - startOT);
        System.out.println("Employee malcom smith makes " + "$" + answer + " this week!");
    }else if (emp3Hours == 73){
        System.out.println("@malcom smith ERROR! Hours worked is invalid!");
    }
    else if (emp3Pay < 8){
         System.out.println("Invalid hourly pay ;("); }
    else {
        answer = emp3Pay * emp3Hours;
        System.out.println("Employee malcom smith makes " + "$" + answer + " this week!");
    }
}

And here's the output of the program:

-Invalid hourly pay ;(
-Employee Jane Doe makes $414.1 this week!
-Employee malcom smith makes $895.0 this week!
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1  
Your code doesn't compile, and when I fix it to compile, I just get Invalid hourly pay ;(. So what do you expect to happen and what is the actual problem in that MIT assignment? If this isn't the full code, please give us more to work with. –  birryree Aug 20 '11 at 3:03
    
Your problem is that you're hard-coding one value set instead of looping through three. –  cwallenpoole Aug 20 '11 at 3:13
1  
You have made no effort to provide a SSCCE: Short Self-Contained Correct Example. Please reduce your code! –  Bohemian Aug 20 '11 at 4:08
1  
I would highly recommend forcing yourself to do two things starting right this very instant: 1)give your variables more meaningful names, and 2)pay attention to how you're formatting your code. If you had to come back and look at this six months from now, would you have any idea what swerzie = emp2Pay * startOT + (emp2Pay * otPay) * (emp2Hours - startOT); meant? This is just an intro course, and it's awesome that you're doing this for yourself, but try to instill these habits in yourself now. –  jonmorgan Aug 20 '11 at 4:35
1  
If you say that your program doesn't do what you want it to do, please also say which outputs you had expected. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Aug 20 '11 at 17:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

See, your code duplicates (triplicates) all logic and calculations This is, erm, suboptimal.

Imagine a procedure that takes hours_worked and base_pay as parameters and prints either the sum earned or a error message. Then apply it three times to three different employees.

Something along the lines of this:

from java.math import BigDecimal; // money is never float or double.

public static void calculateWage(String name, BigDecimal hourly_rate, int hours) {
    final int OVERTIME_THRESHOLD = 40;
    final int HOURS_LIMIT = 60;
    final BigDecimal MIN_HOURLY_RATE = new BigDecimal("8.00"); 
    // ^^^ again, never store money in a floating point form!


    if (hours > HOURS_LIMIT) {
        // what do you do?
    }

    if (hourly_rate.compareTo(MIN_HOURLY_RATE) < 0) { // less than
        // what do you do?
        // now think how to merge it with previous
    }

    if (hours > OVERTIME_THRESHOLD) {
        int overtime = hours - OVERTIME_THRESHOLD;
        // calculate two values and sum them up
    }
    else { // no overtime
        // calculate just one value
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    calculateWage("John", new BigDecimal("7.50"), 73);
    calculateWage("Jane", /* well, you see*/);
}

Isn't this code a bit more readable and neat? Yours can be, too.

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for "This is, erm, suboptimal". –  alpha123 Aug 20 '11 at 4:53
1  
You should make the hourly_wage parameter a BigInteger, too. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Aug 20 '11 at 17:36
    
@paulo-ebermann: Thanks, fixed. –  9000 Aug 21 '11 at 3:29

The first part of the code looks fine:

 double emp1Pay = 7.50,...
 ...
 if (emp1Hours > startOT){
   ...
 else if (emp1Pay < 8){ System.out.println("Invalid hourly pay ;("); }

This prints out exactly what you'd expect if emp1Pay is <8:

"Invalid hourly pay ;(".

SUGGESTIONS:

1) Step through the code a line at a time under the Eclipse debugger. Follow what's happening - and why.

2) Consider "spreading out your code" a bit.

I hope your course examples don't use that coding style - bunching everything together makes it really hard to read. I can only imagine how difficult it must be for a beginner.

Here's a much better example of coding style:

http://java.sun.com/docs/codeconv/html/CodeConventions.doc3.html

3) Consider breaking your logic into a separate method. Instead of duplicating the code (once for each value), just call your new method three times (with three different sets of arguments - but just one block of code).

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