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I'm trying to write the global function:

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const Str& str)
{
for(int i = 0; i < (int)str.mSize; ++i)
    out << str.mBuffer[i];

return out;
}

For a custom string class. It compiles fine but when I go to link:

1>Str.obj : error LNK2005: "class std::basic_ostream<char,struct std::char_traits<char> > & __cdecl operator<<(class std::basic_ostream<char,struct std::char_traits<char> > &,class Str const &)" (??6@YAAAV?$basic_ostream@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@@std@@AAV01@ABVStr@@@Z) already defined in Main.obj
1>C:\Users\Ron\Documents\Visual Studio 2010\Projects\App\Debug\App.exe : fatal error LNK1169: one or more multiply defined symbols found

How could multiple definitions for this exist? I just created the class Str.

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1  
I'm guessing you declared it in a header file. –  GWW Aug 20 '11 at 3:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you define a function in a header file and include it twice, you'll get a multiple definition error, which you have.

To remedy this, declare the function in the header with a prototype and define it in a .cpp file.

Alternately, if you're trying to make a header only library, you could do

class Str {
    // your class stuff

    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const Str& str) {
        for(int i = 0; i < (int)str.mSize; ++i)
            out << str.mBuffer[i];

        return out;
    }
};
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Doh that was a dumb mistake. I thought that wouldn't happen if you used #ifndef to protect the header file from being included more than once. –  Ron Aug 20 '11 at 3:35
    
@Ron the #ifndef thing makes sure the header isn't included more than once in the same file, but if you have more than one source file in your project, you can include the file once in each of those files, which causes the multiple definition errors when the linker tries enforces the one-definition-to-rule-them-all rule. –  Seth Carnegie Aug 20 '11 at 3:37
1  
Will the downvoter please explain why my answer is wrong? –  Seth Carnegie Aug 20 '11 at 4:54

I think you have defined twice in Main.cpp and Str.cpp, or may be .h files.

Write a str.h files which include the declaration of the Str class:

//str.h
class Str {
    // your class stuff

    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const Str& str);
};

then in str.cpp:

//str.cpp
#include "str.h"
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const Str& str) {
    for(int i = 0; i < (int)str.mSize; ++i)
        out << str.mBuffer[i];
    return out;
}

Then you can use the function in you main.cpp.

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Did you put this in a header file?

The right way to do it is to declare it in the header file and put the code in a source file.

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