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I want certain classes in my project to be pooled. And so I don't want to be able to instantiate these classes using: new SomeClass(), but instead obtain a new item from the pool using SomeClass.allocate(). I have this kind of code for each class that needs pooling.

public class GameObject
{
    // Pooling: Provides a static method for allocation and a method for freeing
    private static Pool<GameObject> pool = new Pool<GameObject>();
    public static GameObject allocate() { return pool.obtain(); }
    public void free() { pool.free(this); }
    ...
}

Now I can disable the normal way of instantiating by making the default constructor private, but the problem is that the pool needs to instantiate the class when it's created, and also when the pool needs to expand.

Is there some way to limit construction to only by the pool?

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Did you just move to java from c++? because this sort of thing is done in c++ and is sometimes a good idea in that world, but is probably never a good idea in java. –  Kevin Aug 20 '11 at 5:19
    
I say that btw because conventional wisdom is that the JVM will do a better job of this than you will. –  Kevin Aug 20 '11 at 5:24
    
can you add the code how you are adding the GameObject in Pool –  John Aug 20 '11 at 5:24
    
@Kevin No I didn't. I'm developing a game for Android. The garbage collector on Android devices blocks for up to several hundred milliseconds when it runs, so I need to avoid allocation in the game loop. Object pooling seems to be what most other people are doing. –  terryhau Aug 20 '11 at 5:28
    
Wow that's quite a disaster when javas garbage collector is borderline-unusable –  Kevin Aug 20 '11 at 5:31

3 Answers 3

You have 2 options I can see: either make it an inner-class of the pool or make the allocate method package-private and put it in the same package as the pool.

EDIT: Ah. Just make the constructor private and then override whatever method the Pool uses to create new instances. As a (crude) example using your frame above:

public abstract class Pool<T>
{
    public abstract T getNewObject();

    public T obtain(){ return getNewObject(); }

    public void free(T obj) {}
}

and

public class GameObject
{
    // Pooling: Provides a static method for allocation and a method for freeing
    private static Pool<GameObject> pool = new Pool<GameObject>(){
          public GameObject getNewObject(){ return new GameObject(); }
    };
    public static GameObject allocate() { return pool.obtain(); }
    private GameObject(){}
    public void free() { pool.free(this); }
}

GameObject's constructor is happily inaccessible to anyone else.

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I can't make it an inner class, since the pool is a static member and not enclosed in an instance. –  terryhau Aug 20 '11 at 5:26
    
+1: You should be able to make it a nested class (or static inner class) which should work fine. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 20 '11 at 6:01
    
@Femi Looks like a good solution. Thanks. –  terryhau Aug 20 '11 at 6:15

As a last resort,you are able to use reflection. For other option,other people already tells. I remember Spring container is able to init class that has private constructor. And I am surprised of that. I guess it also uses this trick. The benefit could be it is more generic.

public static void main(String... args) {
    try {
      Constructor c = GameObject.class.getDeclaredConstructor();
      c.setAccessible(true); // solution
      c.newInstance();

      // production code should handle these exceptions more gracefully
    } catch (InvocationTargetException x) {
      x.printStackTrace();
    } catch (NoSuchMethodException x) {
      x.printStackTrace();
    } catch (InstantiationException x) {
      x.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IllegalAccessException x) {
      x.printStackTrace();
    }
  }
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Thanks. I managed to get it to work with this method. –  terryhau Aug 20 '11 at 6:15
    
Accept my answer ff it really helps. :-) –  Clark Bao Aug 20 '11 at 11:19
    
Thank you so much :D That really helped me. But by the way: What declares whether or not my code has Permission to set the constructor accessible? –  MinecraftShamrock Aug 20 '13 at 12:33
    
In general, I would be a little hesitant to use reflection this way to override Java's built-in behavior. But yes this does work. –  U Avalos Nov 11 '13 at 16:18

Alterative: Don't try to make your code jump through hoops. Use static analysis to enforce rules like this. The tools will catch it if you accidentally do something that you didn't intend to.

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