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Whenever I try to connect to MySQL to access phpmyadmin, it returns an error:

Can't connect to local MySQL server through socket '/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock' (13)

I also tried to start MySQL through my server's terminal:

Can't connect to local MySQL server through socket '/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock' (111)

When I restarted MySQL it displayed:

Stopping MySQL database server mysqld
df: `/var/lib/mysql/.': No such file or directory
df: no file systems processed
/etc/init.d/mysql: ERROR: The partition with /var/lib/mysql is too full!

How might I resolve this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've seen that a couple of times. It has meant that the actual MySQL server instance was down for some reason. It was fixed by a simple call to:

service mysql restart

Edit

I just noticed your comment The partition with /var/lib/mysql is too full!. This means your drive is too full to run MySQL. You need to either talk to your server administrator or just clean up the HD, but this will keep breaking until more room is available.

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* Stopping MySQL database server mysqld [ OK ] df: `/var/lib/mysql/.': No such file or directory df: no file systems processed * /etc/init.d/mysql: ERROR: The partition with /var/lib/mysql is too full! On doint that, it returned with above error –  Prashant Singh Aug 20 '11 at 5:26
    
can u explain me how to clean HD by my own ?? –  Prashant Singh Aug 20 '11 at 5:35
    
You're better off going to Superuser or Serverfault for help on the level you probably need it, but the general ways to do this are to remove everything which isn't tied down (erase as many media files as possible, clear temp, etc) and defragment the disk. –  cwallenpoole Aug 20 '11 at 5:41

Normally this happens when you have don't have the mysql daemon started. most distros you can start it by typing in

/etc/init.d/mysqld start

and that should get you going. I think it can sometimes also be that after you did your install you will need to give root a password.

mysqladmin -u root password <enter password here>

You may want to check first that the dameon is atually running by doing a

ps -ef | grep mysql

Credit

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