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I have two variables in PHP, say $a and $b. $a is a string variable. It contains $b. I want to update $a automatically if $b is updated.

$b = 4;
$a = "value is ".$b;
echo $a; // value is 4

$b = 5;
echo $a; // should print value is 5
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1  
What's the use case? Why do you need this? –  outis Aug 20 '11 at 10:12

6 Answers 6

Yes, $a can be updated automatically if you assign $b to $a by reference, but there should not be any string concatenation assigned to $a.

Try:

$b = 4;
$a = &$b;
$c = 'Value is ';

echo $c.$a;

$b = 5;
echo $c.$a;

Here is a demo

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Not possible the way you want it. You see, variables can be passed by reference, like so:

$a = &$b;

Which will cause $a to automatically update when $b changes, however, it may not contain any other value, (like the string you want), so you'll have to use a function or another variable to do it.

$b = &$a;
echo "Value is $b";

or

$b = &$a;
$description = "Value is ";
echo $description . $b;
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PHP doesn't have that feature. Related features you could use are:

  1. References, which let you alias one variable to another. The value of each variable is the same, since they're simply symbol table aliases.

    $b = "I'm b."
    $a =& $b;
    echo $a;
    
  2. Variable variables, in which one variable holds the name of the other.

    $b = "I'm b."
    $a = 'b';
    echo $$a;
    

    However, variable variables should generally be avoided as they generally cause needless obfuscation.

  3. Functions (as mithunsatheesh suggests). This is closest to what you want, as a function call is an expression that will have the value you're looking for. The only place a function wouldn't work where a variable would is when interpolating the value into a double-quoted string or a heredoc. Instead, you'd have to use string concatenation, or assign the result of the function call to a local variable and interpolate that.

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You should pass it by reference. How to do it ?

Make a function:

function showValue(&$b)
{

   return 'value is ' . $b;

}

echo showValue($b);

I think this should work.

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actually I have a string variable which depends upon a number of other variables. So I want to update this variable if any of the other variables updates. Thanks for your valuable replies. I think I should go with function... –  Abhimanyu1310 Aug 20 '11 at 10:29

Take a look at http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.references.whatdo.php

$a = 4;
$b =& $a;
$a = 5;
echo $b; // should print 5;
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When a php script runs it runs "line after line". When you assign like this

$b = 4;
$a = "value is ".$b;

Value of $b is already assigned to $a as a integer 4 (not $b). So, if next $b is updated to some other value. Variable $a has no idea about it.

In this kind of case you have to use function or variable reference as describe in some other answers

   $a = 4;
    $b =& $a;
    $a = 5;
    echo $b; 
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