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For some weird reason, it keeps on creating uninitilized values when I pass in the length as 12, it creates an array of about 16 and stores the rest with crap that I don't want. Anyone know why this isn't working? It's for an assignment that's due tomorrow and this is my last problem... Any help would be appreciated thanks.

char * convertToUppercase (char* toUpSize, int length) {
    std::cout << "ToUpsize: " << toUpSize << "\nLength: " << length << "\n";
    char * upsized = new char[length];
    for (int i = 0; toUpSize[i]; i++) {
        upsized[i] = toupper(toUpSize[i]);
    }
    return upsized;
}
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What do you mean by "creating uninitialized values"? –  Mat Aug 20 '11 at 10:23
    
How do call this function? What args do you pass? –  Nawaz Aug 20 '11 at 10:24
1  
Allocating and returning array of char inside a helper function like that smells of a bad design and possible memory leaks (i.e. are you sure you will always remember to delete returned arrray?). You should either return std::string (C++ style) or add another char * argument - destination array (C style). –  gwiazdorrr Aug 20 '11 at 10:28
1  
Where is the C++ part of this? Can't see any use of std::string. –  Bo Persson Aug 20 '11 at 10:28
1  
@Brandon: Here's the beef. Every C style string you allocate should have a null terminator, and every C style string you allocate should have space allocated for the null terminator. Do both of those and your code will be correct. –  john Aug 20 '11 at 10:45
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4 Answers

I think you either write i< length in the for loop, instead of toUpSize[i] as:

 for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
    upsized[i] = toupper(toUpSize[i]);
 }

Or pass toUpSize as null-terminated string if you want to write toUpSize[i] in the for loop condition. If you do so, then you've to put \0 at the end of upsized after you exit from the loop, at index i for which toUpSize[i] is \0. And to accomplish this, you've te move the definition of i outside the for loop, so that you can use it after you exit from the loop.

Null-terminated string is what which has \0 character at the end of the string.

char x[]  = {'N', 'a', 'w', 'a', 'z' };
char y[]  = {'N', 'a', 'w', 'a', 'z', '\0' };

Here, x is not a null-terminated string, but y is a null-teminated string.

If the strings are defined as:

char z[] = "Nawaz";
const char *s = "Nawaz";

Here z and s are null-terminated string, because both of them are created out of "Nawaz" which is a null-terminated string. Note that sizeof("Nawaz") would return 6, not 5, precisely because there is an \0 at the end of the string.

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Just a question, how do I post code in this comment thing? I will show a little bit more but I made the last value of upsized to be '\0'. When I am debugging using VC++, upsized is actually initilized as: 0x005a16c8 "ÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍýýýý««««««««" char * –  Brandon Aug 20 '11 at 10:42
    
@Brandon: How do you which is last? Why don't you post more code in your question itself? –  Nawaz Aug 20 '11 at 10:48
    
I would post from where the function is called but as I mentioned, since it is an assignment, I don't really want to share it all but... How I get the length value is: –  Brandon Aug 20 '11 at 10:51
    
int ptLength = strlen(plaintext); int kLength = strlen(key); plaintext = convertToUppercase(plaintext, ptLength); key = convertToUppercase(key, kLength); –  Brandon Aug 20 '11 at 10:52
1  
So why do you calculate the length outside of the convertToUppercase function when you actually need the length inside the convertToUppercase function. Doesn't that make your problem harder? You've been told the answers by several people, you need a null terminator and you need to allocate space for a null terminator. Fix both those problems and everything will work. –  john Aug 20 '11 at 10:57
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You need to null-terminate the returned array if you want to print it like a string. Make sure that it ends with a null-terminator. Depending on how you calculate the length argument you may need to add extra space for it to the array. You may also want to make sure that the array that you pass in is null-terminated.

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Sorry to sound stupid but how do you get it to "NULL terminate"? EDIT: Also, looking at it now... Will I have to make the length of upsized length + 1 to allow room for the "\0"? –  Brandon Aug 20 '11 at 10:24
    
You can set the first element after the string to zero. The length of the array has to be the length of the string plus one for the terminator. –  Marcus Karlsson Aug 20 '11 at 10:28
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You need to add the termination char:

char * convertToUppercase (char* toUpSize, int length) {
   std::cout << "ToUpsize: " << toUpSize << "\nLength: " << length << "\n";
   char * upsized = new char[length];
   int i;
   for (i = 0; toUpSize[i]; i++) { // stops when you get toUpSize[i]==0
       upsized[i] = toupper(toUpSize[i]);
   }
   upsized[i] = '\0'; //add termination
   return upsized;
}

Your code assumes length to be the length of the allocated array, not the length of the string. strlen(toUpSize) counts the chars that are not '\0' from position 0 in toUpSize.

E.g.: strlen("abc\0def") -> 3 sizeof("abc\0def") -> 8!

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It seems to be working at the moment :) Thanks for that mate, greatly appreciate your help and same with the post below. –  Brandon Aug 20 '11 at 10:45
    
There is no room for the NUL terminator, hence upsized[i] = '\0' is a buffer overflow. –  FredOverflow Aug 20 '11 at 11:15
    
I've actually made room for the NUL terminator now and the function is working correctly, thankfully but now I have a new problem with the dynamic memory. If you read my latest comment on my first post, any chance you can help? –  Brandon Aug 20 '11 at 11:16
    
Sorry, it's actually on the post below, here is the question though: "Okay, that's all working well and fine now, thanks for your help everyone. I have another problem though... Is there anyway I can write this without using heap memory? Because when I try to allocate an array of char's with a variable, it won't let me because it needs to be a 'constant value' so I use heap memory. The only thing is, I can't actually delete upsized outside of this function. Is there anyway I can either delete it outside this function or write it without dynamic memory?" –  Brandon Aug 20 '11 at 11:19
    
There's room for the null terminator as length is not the strlen. Otherwise just loop to length. The whole point of looping till the termination string is the avoid copying unnecessary chars. –  mradu Aug 20 '11 at 11:24
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Why are you even bothering with char pointers? This is C++, not C.

#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <cstring>
#include <iostream>

std::string to_upper_case(std::string str)
{
    std::transform(str.begin(), str.end(), str.begin(), toupper);
    return str;
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << to_upper_case("hello world\n");
}

If you decide to stick to the C solution, reserve one more char for the NUL terminator and put it there:

char * upsized = new char[length + 1];   // note the +1
upsized[length] = 0;
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1  
If it wasn't an assignment, I would. But unfortunately I have to use C Style Strings. –  Brandon Aug 20 '11 at 11:11
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