Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm reading a binary file using perl. In the file's headers, there's 4 bytes that represents MS-DOS time. How do I read this time? I'm not familiar with this format.

I've found this for reference: http://www.vsft.com/hal/dostime.htm but I'm still not sure how to read it.

share|improve this question
    
You will need to unpack the raw bytes, then use bitwise & and shifts to extract the values (or maybe you could do it directly with unpack; it's fairly versatile and intended for precisely this sort of task). See perldoc.perl.org/perlpacktut.html – tripleee Aug 20 '11 at 13:25
    
I did my $dostime = unpack 'l', $data; my $year = 1980 + ($dostime >> 9); but I get the year as 2068586. – oopy Aug 20 '11 at 13:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Another approach:

sub mst {
  my $msdos_time = shift;
  my @t = map { ord }
          map { pack("b*", $_) }
          map { reverse($_) }
          unpack("A5 A6 A5 A5 A4 A7", unpack("b*", $msdos_time));
  my %d;
  @d{seconds,minutes,hours,day,month,year} = @t;
  $d{seconds} *= 2;
  $d{year} += 1980;
  return \%d;
}

This will work if $msdos_time is represented in little-endian format which (I believe) is how it would be laid out in memory.

(Clearly the chained map-s could be coalesced - I wrote it this way to make it easier to see what was going on.)

Example:

print Dumper(mst("\x22\x12\x01\x41"));

# byte 0   | byte 1   | byte 2   | byte 3
# 76543210 | 76543210 | 76543210 | 76543210
#    S...s                                   seconds
# ..m             M..                        minutes
#            H...h                           hours
#                          D...d             day
#                       ..m               M  month
#                                  Y.....y   year
# 00100010 | 00010010 | 00000001 | 01000001

$VAR1 = {
      'seconds' => 4,
      'hours' => 2,
      'month' => 8,
      'day' => 1,
      'minutes' => 17,
      'year' => 2012
    };
share|improve this answer
    
This works. Can you explain what those maps do? First it unpacks into binary.. then what? What is A5 A6 A5 A5 A4 A7 for? Why reversed and packed again? I'm trying to compare this against what it says in the link I posted (0-4 bit for second, 5-10 bits for minute etc) and I don't get uses that. – oopy Aug 20 '11 at 20:58
    
The A5 A6 ... comes from the width in bits for each field: 5 bits for seconds, 6 bits for minutes, etc. To understand the algorithm, just step through it one function at a time: first print out what $x1 = unpack("b*", ...) does; then print out @x2 = unpack("A5...", $x1), etc. – ErikR Aug 20 '11 at 22:34

You can't use pack because it always wants to start on a byte boundary. Some of these values go across byte boundaries too, so you don't want to deal with individual bytes (although words would work). It's easier to just to mask and shift.

In this example, I set up the masks so I don't have to think too hard about it, then use those to grab the values out of the string. I don't really know anything about the DOS time format, but from what I've read, you have to multiply the seconds by 2 (notice it's only five bits):

use 5.010;
use strict;
use warnings;

use Data::Dumper;

# seconds   minutes   hours    day    month   years from 1980
#  5 bits    6         5        5       4       7
my $datetime = 0b11011_000011_11111_01100_1011_0001000;

my $parsed = parse( $datetime );
print Dumper( $parsed );

sub parse {
    my( $datetime ) = @_;
    state $masks = make_masks();

    my %this = map {
        $_, ( $datetime & $masks->{$_}[0] ) >> $masks->{$_}[1]
        } keys %$masks;

    $this{seconds} *= 2;
    $this{years} += 1980;

    return \%this;
    }

sub make_masks {
    my %masks = (
        seconds => [ 0b11111,  27 ],
        minutes => [ 0b111111, 21 ],
        hours   => [ 0b11111,  16 ],
        day     => [ 0b11111,  11 ],
        month   => [ 0b1111,    7 ],
        years   => [ 0b1111111, 0 ],
        );  

    foreach my $key ( sort { $masks{$a}[1] <=> $masks{$b}[1] } keys %masks ) {
        $masks{$key}[0] <<= $masks{$key}[1];
        }

    return \%masks;
    }

My output is just a hash:

$VAR1 = {
          'seconds' => 54,
          'hours' => 31,
          'years' => 1988,
          'month' => 11,
          'minutes' => 3,
          'day' => 12
        };
share|improve this answer
    
near the top, what's my_unpack? – ErikR Aug 20 '11 at 15:21
    
@user5402 - it looks like my_unpack should be parse – bvr Aug 20 '11 at 16:58
    
have a look at my solution which uses pack and unpack – ErikR Aug 20 '11 at 20:29
    
I don't understand this code. In make_masks(), what are those values for seconds, minutes, etc (27, 21, 16 11, 7, 0)? In parse(), why is state used instead of my? You said don't use unpack, but then how would I do it when I'm reading a binary file? I get Argument "pM-%M-a>" isn't numeric in bitwise and (&) if I don't unpack. Or am I supposed to unpack as binary? – oopy Aug 20 '11 at 20:29
    
@oopy, those numbers are the position of each field in bits. state is used so the masks only have to be calculated once. You would use unpack to convert the 4-byte value to an integer, and pass that integer to parse. – cjm Aug 20 '11 at 22:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.