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SA, What I know is that Objective-C is a strict superset of C..

But when I've tried a very simple enum example that I used to use in C, it didn't work in objective C,

Here's the code:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

int main(void)
{
    typedef enum 
    {
        SUN, MON, TUES
    }DAYS;

    DAYS d = MON;

    NSLog(@"%@", d);

    return 0;
}

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    typedef enum 
    {
        SUN, MON, TUES
    }DAYS;

    DAYS d = MON;

    printf("%d\n", d);

    return 0;
}

In C, it works perfectly, but in objective-c (I am using GNUstep on WIN) it crashes when executing (no compile-time errors)

Can anyone tell me why?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

%@ is an object specifier and enums are an int (signed or unsigned). To print an enum in Objective-C you need to use %d in your NSLog.

NSLog(@"%d", d);

Your original example was crashing because it expected d to be an object so it would try and send the description message to an object residing at memory address 1 (the value of MON).

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Try this

int main(void)
{
    typedef enum 
    {
        SUN, MON, TUES
    }DAYS;

    DAYS d = MON;

    NSLog(@"%d", d); //here is your mistake happened, because enum return values are integers.

    return 0;
}

Hope this help

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Just use

NSLog(@"%d", d);

instead of

NSLog(@"%@", d);

Remember, in Objective-C, not everything automatically becomes an object. Primitive types in C are still just primitive types. Therefore, in NSLog's formatting string, you still need to use the same specifier you always used.

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It crashes because of the NSLog(@"%@") statement. The %@ format specifier expects an instance of NSObject* (or a subclass), while you pass enum item (ie. int) .

Try NSLog("%d\n", d);

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And with boxed expressions, you can keep on using %@ in your format specifiers:

NSLog(@"%@", @(d));

This is not exactly optimum, but it's really not a problem while you're debugging. If you're dumping string-formatted numbers by the millions, go with a proper number format.

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