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I was trying to compile the following code with Clang 3.0. It fails to link, am I doing something wrong here or this is a compiler bug?

The error follows

Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64:
"__ZN9int_arrayIJLi0ELi1ELi2ELi3ELi4ELi5ELi6ELi7ELi8EEE4listE", referenced from: __ZN9int_arrayIJLi0ELi1ELi2ELi3ELi4ELi5ELi6ELi7ELi8EEE5printEv in cc-JDTbNl.o ld: symbol(s) not found for architecture x86_64

The code follows

#include <iostream>

static const int a[] = {0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8};

template<int... Numbers> struct int_array;

template<int... Numbers>
struct int_array {
  int x;
  const static int list[] = {Numbers...};
  static void print() {
    for (const int x : list) {
        std::cout << x <<std::endl;
    }
  }
  static void print2() {
    for (const int x : a) {
        std::cout << x <<std::endl;
    }
  }
};

typedef int_array<0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8> array_of_ints;

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
  array_of_ints::print();
  array_of_ints::print2();
  return 0;
}
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2 Answers 2

Your code is wrong for two reasons

  • You cannot initialize a static data member in-class if it is not of integer or enumeration type and not constexpr
  • You miss a definition for int_array<yournumbers>::list. As you are odr-using that member, you need to define it.

It's not a clang bug. Once clang gets constexpr support and when you then add a definition of out class (which then cannot have an initializer), as you already provided one in-class) and replace const by constexpr the code should then work fine.


For the general public, here is the PR that @James sent to Clang.

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I'm not at all an expert on c++0x, and hope somebody more knowledgeable would come here... but does C++0x allow in-class initialization of static members? If so, clang just doesn't implement it yet. If not, you can't. The (almost) standard, 9.4.2 item 3, says any const literal type can be initiazlied; and 3.9 item 10 says an array of int is a literal. So, I guess this is a bug of clang 3.0, but there may be further rules in the case of variadic templates...

Anyway, changing your code as follows worked for me:

template<int... Numbers>
struct int_array {
  int x;
  const static int list[];
  static void print() ;
};

template<int... Numbers>
const int int_array<Numbers...>::list[]={Numbers...};

template<int... Numbers>
void int_array<Numbers...>::print(){
    for (const int x : list) {
        std::cout << x <<std::endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think in-class initialization is only allowed for static const integral members. –  Kerrek SB Aug 20 '11 at 23:04
    
Thank you for you response on this I will submit this as possible bug to the clang guys –  James Aug 21 '11 at 4:32
    
@Kerek That was the situation in C++03, I think. In C++11, it's OK to have in-class initialization for any literal const static members. –  Yuji Aug 21 '11 at 5:09

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