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Is this the best way to incrememnt a count in a dictionary? If the key I'm incrementing doesn't exist I'd like to set it to 1.

     public void IncrementCount(Dictionary<int, int> someDictionary, int id)
     {  
         int currentCount;
         if (someDictionary.TryGetValue(id, out currentCount))
         {
             someDictionary[id] = currentCount + 1;
         }
         else
         {
             someDictionary[id] = 1;
         }
     }
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What are you trying to achieve with this? What problem are you solving? –  Oded Aug 20 '11 at 15:36
    
The Dictionary object doesn't really have a 'count' and it doesn't really make sense to 'decrement' it like you would an array. Having said that, the code you provided should work, though I think there are more succinct ways to handle the situation: check the Dictionary object's built in methods. –  Pete855217 Aug 20 '11 at 15:36

4 Answers 4

As it turns out it made sense to use the ConcurrentDictionary which has the handy upsert method: AddOrUpdate.

So, I just used:

someDictionary.AddOrUpdate(id, 1, (id, count) => count + 1);  
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1  
That is fine, but I imagine there is some overhead to deal with thread issues. –  goalie7960 Aug 20 '11 at 16:20
    
+1 nice one..... –  Tigran Aug 20 '11 at 17:42
2  
Any reason you didn't accept this? –  Shadow Wizard Feb 20 '12 at 13:17

Your code is fine. But here's a way to simplify in a way that doesn't require branching in your code:

int currentCount;

// currentCount will be zero if the key id doesn't exist..
someDictionary.TryGetValue(id, out currentCount); 

someDictionary[id] = currentCount + 1;

This relies on the fact that the TryGetValue method sets value to the default value of its type if the key doesn't exist. In your case, the default value of int is 0, which is exactly what you want.

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1  
This code will not work. You are correct that if the key doesn't exist in the dictionary, currentCount will be 0. But that also means someDictinary[id] will throw a KeyNotFoundException. –  JBSnorro Aug 20 '11 at 17:15
4  
@JBSnorro: No, this will work fine; I encourage you to try it. Note that the setter of the indexer is being called, not the getter. From the documentation: " When you set the property value, if the key is in the Dictionary<TKey, TValue>, the value associated with that key is replaced by the assigned value. If the key is not in the Dictionary<TKey, TValue>, the key and value are added to the dictionary." –  Ani Aug 20 '11 at 17:20
    
Hm sorry. I wasn't aware of that, thank you for pointing it out. –  JBSnorro Aug 20 '11 at 21:19
    
A source for that setter-creation comment: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9tee9ht2.aspx "a set operation creates a new element with the specified key" –  Curtis Yallop Nov 9 '13 at 3:18

It is readable and the intent is clear. I think this is fine. No need to invent some smarter or shorter code; if it doesn't keep the intent just as clear as your initial version :-)

That being said, here is a slightly shorter version:

public void IncrementCount(Dictionary<int, int> someDictionary, int id)
{
    if (!someDictionary.ContainsKey(id))
        someDictionary[id] = 0;

    someDictionary[id]++;
}

If you have concurrent access to the dictionary, remember to synchronize access to it.

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1  
His code startet with 1 when it was not contained. –  Janick Bernet Aug 20 '11 at 15:40
3  
@inflagranti - this does too. (It increments the zero before returning - it was an example of a way to get less conditionals in the method). –  driis Aug 20 '11 at 15:41
    
Doesn't this require an extra look up when id does not exist? –  goalie7960 Aug 20 '11 at 15:48
    
You're right, sorry. So I'd say the original code is more readable then ;) –  Janick Bernet Aug 20 '11 at 15:49
2  
Yes it does require an extra lookup when ID does not exist. I read "best way" as "shorter/simpler". If "best way" means "most performant", the original version should be slightly more efficient. However, I doubt it will be measurable, unless this is used in a tight loop. –  driis Aug 20 '11 at 15:53

Here's a nice extension method:

    public static void Increment<T>(this Dictionary<T, int> dictionary, T key)
    {
        int count;
        dictionary.TryGetValue(key, out count);
        dictionary[key] = count + 1;
    }

Usage:

var dictionary = new Dictionary<string, int>();
dictionary.Increment("hello");
dictionary.Increment("hello");
dictionary.Increment("world");

Assert.AreEqual(2, dictionary["hello"]);
Assert.AreEqual(1, dictionary["world"]);
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