Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm creating a Java socket in Javascript, sending an HTTP request and receiving a response correctly but I seem to be unable to detect an EOF or the server closing the socket at the end. What am I doing wrong? The problem is we never exit the outermost while loop - the server stops transmitting and (presumably) closes its end of the connection, yet receiver.read() never returns -1 and all the socket methods return state consistent with the socket still being connected.

    var s = new java.net.Socket("www.google.com",80);
    var sender = new java.io.PrintStream(s.getOutputStream());
    var receiver = s.getInputStream();
    sender.print("GET / HTTP/1.0\r\n\r\n");
    sender.flush();
    s.shutdownOutput();
    var response = '';
    var eof = 0;
    while( !eof && s.isConnected() && s.isBound() && !s.isClosed() && !s.isInputShutdown() )
    {  
       if( receiver.available() )
       {
        while( receiver.available() )
        {
         var i = receiver.read();
         if( i == -1 ) { eof = 1; }
         else { response += String.fromCharCode(i); }
        }
        // at this point response does contain the expected HTTP response
       }
    }

    // in case remote end closed the socket before we got a chance to read all the bytes from it        
    // ...but this is never reached!
    while( receiver.available() )
    { 
      response += String.fromCharCode(receiver.read());
    }

    alert( response );
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

Wouldn't the this:

      while( receiver.available() && !eof)

be better? in lieu of the first while( receiver.available()) ?

share|improve this answer
    
Seems a bit redundant - available() is defined as returning the number of bytes of data available to read without blocking, so would return 0 after EOF. Tried it anyway just in case; doesn't fix the problem. –  moonshadow Apr 3 '09 at 9:58
    
Or do you mean in place of the outermost while? Data being available to read without blocking is independent of whether the server has closed the socket - there could be pauses in transmission, and the OS could have buffered input data. So we must test both separately. –  moonshadow Apr 3 '09 at 10:04
    
No, I meant the inner while, but your first comment is right: I'm wrong. –  Nicolas Apr 3 '09 at 10:07

Ok. What's the value of eof when the code reaches this comment?
// at this point response does contain the expected HTTP response

What's the symptom? I assume it's an infinite loop?

share|improve this answer
    
eof is still 0 at that point (otherwise we'd exit the outermost while() correctly and I'd not be posting this). Question edited - hopefully the problem is clearer now? –  moonshadow Apr 3 '09 at 10:12
up vote 0 down vote accepted

OK, further research suggests there is no non-blocking way to discover whether the remote side has closed a socket. However, it is possible to achieve this using NIO channels:

    var s = new java.nio.channels.SocketChannel.open(new java.net.InetSocketAddress( "www.google.com",80) );
    //ew, but while we're prototyping...
    s.configureBlocking(true); 
    var sender = new java.io.PrintStream(s.socket().getOutputStream());
    sender.print("GET / HTTP/1.0\r\n\r\n");
    sender.flush();

    s.configureBlocking(false); // yayy!

    var response = '';
    var len = 0;
    var dbuf = java.nio.ByteBuffer.allocate( 1024 );
    while( len >= 0 )
    {    
         len = s.read( dbuf );
         dbuf.flip();
         while( dbuf.hasRemaining() )
         { 
           response += String.fromCharCode( dbuf.get() );
         }
         dbuf.clear();
    }

    alert( response );
share|improve this answer

When the end of the stream is reached, available() returns 0, so in your code, you never read the -1

share|improve this answer
    
Right. But read() will block until either EOF is reached or there is more data, and Javascript is single-threaded so we don't want to issue a read without knowing for certain we have data to read. And available() can return 0 during transmission, so we can't use that to test for EOF. –  moonshadow Apr 3 '09 at 13:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.