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I need to pass a file path name to a module which creates a report document as pdf,html etc.How do I build the file path name from a directory name,base file name and a fileformat string ?

The directory may or may not exist at the time of call

for example

dir_name='/home/me/dev/my_reports'
base_filename='daily_report'
format = 'pdf'

I need to create a string '/home/me/dev/my_reports/daily_report.pdf'

concatenating the pieces manually didn't seem to be a good way. I tried os.path.join

join(dir_name,base_filename,format)

but it gives

'/home/me/dev/my_reports/daily_report/pdf'
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2 Answers 2

up vote 24 down vote accepted

This works fine:

os.path.join(dir_name, base_filename + "." + filename_suffix)

Keep in mind that os.path.join() exists to smooth over the different path separator characters used by different operating systems. File name "extensions" only have significant meaning on one major operating system (they're simply part of the file name on non-Windows systems), and their separator character is always a dot. There's no need for a function to join them, but if you prefer to use one, you can do this:

os.path.join(dir_name, '.'.join((base_filename, filename_suffix)))

Or, if you want to keep your code really clean, make the dot part of the suffix:

dir_name='/home/me/dev/my_reports'
base_filename='daily_report'
filename_suffix = '.pdf'
os.path.join(dir_name, base_filename + filename_suffix)
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1  
You mentioned that the OS separator may not be .. For this one can use os.extsep. –  CraftyThumber Mar 18 '13 at 14:25
1  
I mentioned no such thing. –  ʇsәɹoɈ Jun 11 '13 at 21:35
1  
You went to some lengths to explain that 'File name "extensions" only have significant meaning on one major operating system (they're simply part of the file name on non-Windows systems), and their separator character is always a dot'. The OP also expressed they saw /pdf at the end. So you could have done os.path.join(dir_name, base_filename, os.extsep, extension). Your answer is perfectly correct. –  CraftyThumber Jun 12 '13 at 14:00
    
The code in your comment would not work, but I guess it doesn't matter because anyone who tries it will discover that for themselves. –  ʇsәɹoɈ Jun 13 '13 at 19:18
4  
Please don't take it personally when I point out an error. My comments were not digs at you; they're simply keeping misinformation at bay. There's no need for name-calling. –  ʇsәɹoɈ Jun 14 '13 at 17:55

Um, why not just:

>>>> import os
>>>> os.path.join(dir_name, base_filename + "." + format)
'/home/me/dev/my_reports/daily_report.pdf'

?

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thanks,but I was hoping there was a cleaner way of appending that extension..python even has a splitext function to cut off the extension..so there has to be something to do the reverse –  Damon Julian Aug 20 '11 at 16:16
1  
The splitext function retains the '.' at the front of the extension. This is likely the cleanest way to do it. If you want it to "look" cleaner in your code, I'd suggest using a function or a lambda function. –  Vorticity Aug 20 '11 at 21:19

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