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I am trying to compare two arrays with eachother. I tried this code and got the following errors

static bool ArraysEqual(Array a1, Array a2)
{
    if (a1 == a2)
        return true;

    if (a1 == null || a2 == null)
        return false;

    if (a1.Length != a2.Length)
        return false;

    IList list1 = a1, list2 = a2; //error CS0305: Using the generic type 'System.Collections.Generic.IList<T>' requires '1' type arguments
    for (int i = 0; i < a1.Length; i++)
    {
        if (!Object.Equals(list1[i], list2[i])) //error CS0021: Cannot apply indexing with [] to an expression of type 'IList'(x2)
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}

Why do i get that error? i went for a low tech solution and did this which works fine but i need to copy/paste it several times for each type.

static bool ArraysEqual(byte[] a1, byte[] a2)
{
    if (a1 == a2)
        return true;

    if (a1 == null || a2 == null)
        return false;

    if (a1.Length != a2.Length)
        return false;

    for (int i = 0; i < a1.Length; i++)
    {
        if (a1[i] != a2[i])
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 50 down vote accepted

"Why do i get that error?" - probably, you don't have "using System.Collections;" at the top of the file - only "using System.Collections.Generic;" - however, generics are probably safer - see below:

static bool ArraysEqual<T>(T[] a1, T[] a2)
{
    if (ReferenceEquals(a1,a2))
        return true;

    if (a1 == null || a2 == null)
        return false;

    if (a1.Length != a2.Length)
        return false;

    EqualityComparer<T> comparer = EqualityComparer<T>.Default;
    for (int i = 0; i < a1.Length; i++)
    {
        if (!comparer.Equals(a1[i], a2[i])) return false;
    }
    return true;
}
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1  
Thank you for the 2nd time today Marc :D –  acidzombie24 Apr 3 '09 at 10:21
    
this should work only for sorted arrays. if they are not sorted you need at least O(nlgn). –  DarthVader Apr 6 '11 at 14:17
3  
@user177883 Eh? If the two arrays are in different order, should they not be considered different? –  RandomInsano Apr 10 '11 at 4:48
2  
@RandomInsano indeed; in the question as asked, order was important –  Marc Gravell Apr 10 '11 at 7:31
1  
@DarthVader: Those would be identical sets, but not identical arrays. –  Ben Voigt May 21 '13 at 0:48

Providing that you have LINQ available and don't care too much about performance, the easiest thing is the following:

var arraysAreEqual = Enumerable.SequenceEqual(a1, a2);

In fact, it's probably worth checking with Reflector or ILSpy what the SequenceEqual methods actually does, since it may well optimise for the special case of array values anyway!

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10  
Or just a1.SequenceEquals(a2). What leads you to believe this would perform any worse than the accepted answer? –  Joel Mueller Apr 3 '09 at 20:28
4  
I suppose the enumerable version can't rely on comparing lengths, so the accepted answer would be faster in cases where the arrays being compared were of different lengths. –  Joel Mueller Apr 3 '09 at 20:29
    
@Joel: That's essentially the reason. The SequenceEquals method uses enumerators, which means instantiating an iterator and then making numerous function calls to loop through it, all adding overhead. Normally I wouldn't think twice about using this method - it was just a small caveat. –  Noldorin Apr 3 '09 at 20:33
2  
I wouldn't be surprised if Enumerable.SequenceEqual is optimised to check if the enumerables are arrays etc. I tried checking the method in ILSpy but it only showed an empty method with a TargetedPatchingOptOut attribute on it. –  mackenir Dec 13 '12 at 18:04
1  
If you know the arrays will frequently be of different lengths, you can add a1.Length == a2.Length && before. –  Guvante Mar 22 '13 at 16:09

SequenceEqual can be faster. Namely in the case where almost all of the time, both arrays have indeed the same length and are not the same object.

It's still not the same functionality as the OP's function, as it won't silently compare null values.

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Recommending SequenceEqual is ok, but thinking that it may ever be faster than usual for(;;) loop is too naive.

Here is the reflected code:

public static bool SequenceEqual<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> first, 
    IEnumerable<TSource> second, IEqualityComparer<TSource> comparer)
{
    if (comparer == null)
    {
        comparer = EqualityComparer<TSource>.Default;
    }
    if (first == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("first");
    }
    if (second == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("second");
    }
    using (IEnumerator<TSource> enumerator = first.GetEnumerator())     
    using (IEnumerator<TSource> enumerator2 = second.GetEnumerator())
    {
        while (enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            if (!enumerator2.MoveNext() || !comparer.Equals(enumerator.Current, enumerator2.Current))
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        if (enumerator2.MoveNext())
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

As you can see it uses 2 enumerators and fires numerous method calls which seriously slow everything down. Also it doesn't check length at all, so in bad cases it can be ridiculously slower.

Compare moving two iterators with beautiful

if (a1[i] != a2[i])

and you will know what I mean about performance.

It can be used in cases where performance is really not so critical, maybe in unit test code, or in cases of some short list in rarely called methods.

share|improve this answer
    
I slightly modified your code. Specific the using statement. I almost made it use var but left it alone –  acidzombie24 May 21 '13 at 0:06

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