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In a single .Java file, is it possible to have a public interface and a public class (which implements the interface)

I'm new to Java coding and it is written on most places on the net that a .java file cannot contain more than 2 public class. I want to know if it is true for the interface and a class also.

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possible duplicate of Java: Multiple class declarations in one file –  Romain Hippeau Aug 20 '11 at 17:55

5 Answers 5

No, it's not possible. A single (top-level) public class or interface per .java file, those are the rules...

Besides, the public class / interface must have the same name as the source file and classes and interfaces share namespace, so it doesn't work for that reason either ;-)

You could however have a package-protected interface in the same file. This compiles fine (if you put it in a file named Test.java:

interface SomeInterface {
    // ...
}


public class Test implements SomeInterface {
    // ...
}
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2  
    
Geez, @Matt, I've been looking for that since you posted your comment, 45 minutes ago. When I read, "those are the rules" I had to go to the actual rules, the Java Language Spec. I wish I would have refreshed the question before I'd found the answer myself! :) –  Paul Aug 20 '11 at 18:42

You can have as many public classes as you want in one file if you use nested classes. In your example:

public interface I {
    public class C implements I {
        ...
    }

    public class D implements I {
        ...
    }

    ...
}
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Exactly! I was about to post a similar answer. Could you please tell me what's the point of having such a structure though? If I try to instantiate class 'C' I am forced to re-implement the methods defined in 'I', even if I already did it when defying class 'C'! P.S. I guess 'C' doesn't need to be static.. –  Gevorg Aug 20 '11 at 17:56
    
@Gevorg -- The static keyword means that its the same as a top-level class. The only difference here is that you can only refer to C as I.C –  Kal Aug 20 '11 at 18:00
1  
I often use this idiom if I define an interface 'I' and a "default implementation" of 'I' that is used if no special instance is needed. I like this because I can have them close - no need to scatter them among several files. And besides that it just reads awesome to say: setParam(new Interface.Default()); If I didn't use an inner class there I had to think about a clever name, this way I can just call it Default. –  emboss Aug 20 '11 at 18:04
2  
Member classes of interfaces are implicitly public and static. –  Nicola Musatti Aug 20 '11 at 18:08
    
@emboss -- One point. I think the word "inner" is confusing in the context of static classes. Typically, these are referred to nested classes. Also, I dont think you need public or static since its nested inside an interface. Good answer. +1. –  Kal Aug 20 '11 at 18:09
public interface A
{
    public void helloWorld();

    public static class B implements A{

        @Override
        public void helloWorld() {
            System.out.print("Hello World");

        }

    }
}
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The Java rule is that only one public class or interface can show up in a source file, and the name must match the file (i.e. Test.java --> public class Test or public interface Test, but not both).

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One also needs to understand interface driven programming as next step while understanding an interface. It tell what is actual use of interface. What role it plays in a Java (or any other language) program.

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