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Please I am having a problem querying for the Top N per category from a data set resembling the one shown below. I have see various thread on this but I am having problem adapting their query to my specific problem.

+----+---------------------------------+-------+
| ID | Prod                            |Cat Id |
+----+---------------------------------+-------+
|  1 |  kntrn                          |     1 |
|  2 | kntrn e                         |     1 |
|  3 | e spl                           |     1 |
|  4 | spl php                         |     1 |
|  5 | php cicarredgtal                |     1 |
|  6 | cicarredgtal servecounterstrike |     1 |
|  7 | servecounterstrike com          |     1 |
|  8 |  zlv                            |     2 |
|  9 | zlv enter                       |     2 |
| 10 | spl php                         |     2 |
+----+---------------------------------+-------+

I want to group based on this rule (1) Select Top 3 Prod for each catid.

Please do note that top in this sense is the one highest count of prod in all category.

So for the example above spl php is the highest for catID 1 because it occurs twice across all category.

share|improve this question
    
MySQL does not support the TOP keyword, you need to use LIMIT and ORDER BY to get the same result. forums.sqlwire.com/showthread.php?t=32853 –  Sean Ringel Aug 20 '11 at 18:00
    
I understand this but I am having problem with forming a correlated subquery for a problem like this . –  damola Aug 20 '11 at 18:03
    
Limiting the result count per group is a complicated thing. It's easier to make several queries for every category. –  Karolis Aug 20 '11 at 18:04
    
Is there another table involved? One that has a category and product relationship? –  Sean Ringel Aug 20 '11 at 18:05
    
It is a legacy table I met on the project and there is not category, product relationship table. Not normalized well I presummed –  damola Aug 20 '11 at 18:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This may not be very pretty, but I think it'll work:

SELECT cat_id, prod, pos FROM (
    SELECT cat_id, pos, prod, if(@last_id = cat_id, @cnt := @cnt + 1, (@cnt := 0 || @last_id := cat_id)) cnt
    FROM (
        SELECT p.cat_id, pseq.cnt pos, pseq.prod
        FROM (
            SELECT prod, count(*) cnt FROM prods GROUP BY prod ORDER BY cnt DESC
        ) pseq
        INNER JOIN prods p ON p.prod = pseq.prod
        ORDER BY cat_id, pseq.cnt DESC
    ) po
) plist
WHERE cnt <= 3;

Based on the above data, this will return:
+--------+-----------+-----+
| cat_id | prod      | pos |
+--------+-----------+-----+
|      1 | spl php   |   2 |
|      1 |  kntrn    |   1 |
|      1 | kntrn e   |   1 |
|      2 | spl php   |   2 |
|      2 |  zlv      |   1 |
|      2 | zlv enter |   1 |
+--------+-----------+-----+
share|improve this answer
    
By the way, I like these exercises for the brainwork, but I recommend putting the solution more in code than in a single MySQL query. –  Doug Kress Aug 20 '11 at 18:51
    
Why do you think it is better in code than in sql. That would require mant trip to the database I guess. –  damola Aug 20 '11 at 18:58
    
Depends on your server usage, frequently it's better to do many tiny round trips to the database than one long query. On a large data set, this query will run fairly slowly. Also, it's very specific to MySQL, and will be hard to port if you ever want to change. –  Doug Kress Aug 20 '11 at 19:02
    
This query does a cartesian multiplication of sort and does not return the top 3 of each category . –  damola Aug 20 '11 at 19:08
    
Hmm. It worked on the sample dataset you supplied. Also, I don't see how it does a cartesian multiplication - the only time I join the table into itself is on a distinct occurrence of prod - I'll include the output of the query based on the data above. –  Doug Kress Aug 20 '11 at 19:11

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