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I know this issue has been asked to death, but for some reason, out of the 20 posts that I've read, nothing is working properly for me and hopefully someone could shed some insight.

Basically, I have a simple shopping cart, where I want to redirect 2 uri's to HTTPS, my checkout page, and my admin folder:

/checkout
/admin

I can successfully redirect to the HTTPS version for checkout with the following code:

RewriteEngine On
#https
RewriteCond %{SERVER_PORT} !^443$
RewriteRule ^checkout https://palatinehillsestatewinery.com/checkout [R=301,L]

# remove index.php, this is just included to show everything in my .htaccess
RewriteCond $1 !\.(gif|jpe?g|png)$ [NC]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f 
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d 
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /index.php/$1 [L]

The problem I've found with this and all other solutions, is that once I decide to go back to a page that shouldn't be HTTPS, the url stays HTTPS.

I've been fumbling with loops etc.

If anyone could help with redirecting to HTTPS on just these 2 pages, and then http on all other pages, that would be a great help and much appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Fixed your title, as I suspect you don't need to redirect HTTP to HTTP. –  ceejayoz Aug 20 '11 at 18:01
1  
Your approach doesn't sound secure, and here's why: if you let the user login when he connects using HTTP, then you are exposing his login credentials to any eavesdropper. I have no idea what you are trying to gain by avoiding HTTPS but please stop doing this. SSL doesn't take as much resources as you could think. And it's definitely not the right place for page load speed optimization as well. –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Aug 20 '11 at 18:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

This is not answering your question directly, but I feel I put it as an answer (plus it is too big to post as a comment).

My advice: please stop playing with htaccess for this kind of task (force few URLs to use HTTPS and force the rest to use HTTP).

The best way is to generate FULL URLs for all links (pages, not resources), where URL includes domain name and protocol. In this case all URLs will have proper protocol (HTTP/HTTPS) straight away. Of course: you can still fix (301 or 302 redirect) requests to supposed-to-be-https if they (for some strange reason) are requested via HTTP. That's where .htaccess can be safely and easily used.

If user will request normal page (should be served over HTTP) via HTTPS -- then let him do it -- there is nothing wrong with that. Yes -- HTTPS requires a bit more resources on server side, but if you generate all links in such way, there will be virtually no such situations, unless user specifically changes protocol. Even if such one page will be served over HTTPS, the next "normal" link he click will be HTTP -- 1 extra HTTPS-based page view will not kill your server.

I'm using this approach all the time when site is having secure area .. and based on the logs, we have less than 0.01% of ALL page views that were viewed/attempted to be viewed via "wrong" protocol -- vast majority of them were bots or attempts to hack/vulnerability search.

Based on such stats I would say -- it is working perfectly. yes -- you need to alter you code/templates a bit to implement this .. but it is much better than messing with .htaccess and mod_rewrite.


In any case, here are the rules that would do the job for you:

# force https for all URLs in /checkout
RewriteCond %{HTTPS} =off
RewriteRule ^checkout https://%{HTTP_HOST}%{REQUEST_URI} [R=301,L]

# don't do anything for images/css/js
RewriteRule \.(gif|jpe?g|png|css|js)$ - [NC,L]

# force http for all other URLs that are not in /checkout
RewriteCond %{HTTPS} =on
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/(checkout|index.php/checkout)
RewriteRule .* http://%{HTTP_HOST}%{REQUEST_URI} [R=301,L]

# your other rules here, e.g.:
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f 
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d 
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /index.php/$1 [L]

OR

# force https for all URLs in /checkout
RewriteCond %{HTTPS} =off
RewriteRule ^checkout https://%{HTTP_HOST}%{REQUEST_URI} [R=301,L]

# do not do anything for already existing files
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -f [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -d
RewriteRule .+ - [L]

# force http for all other URLs that are not in /checkout
RewriteCond %{HTTPS} =on
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/checkout
RewriteRule .* http://%{HTTP_HOST}%{REQUEST_URI} [R=301,L]

# your other rules here, e.g.:
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f 
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d 
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /index.php/$1 [L]
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, for some reason I am still having an issue. The site in question is palatinehillsestatewinery.com and the issue is on the checkout. If you add some products and try to check out, you'll see the https issue. Basically, I don't see any https redirect with this code, and instead it seems to break my "remove index.php" rule, causing the url to look like this, without https: palatinehillsestatewinery.com/index.php/checkout Thoughts? –  Anthony Aug 20 '11 at 21:22
    
I have modified condition: try RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/(checkout|index.php/checkout) instead of RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/checkout (yeah -- we have to consider already rewritten rule as well -- I did not paid enough attention to the fact that /checkout/ is not REAL folder/file). Alternatively try 2nd variant (sorry -- code untested as I cannot connect to my Apache box right now, but should work fine). –  LazyOne Aug 20 '11 at 21:57
    
This is an old answer, but a point worth bringing up is that if you are calling external libraries, as is common when littering a site with social media buttons, sometimes those cannot be over HTTPS, so you get browser errors of various types concerning loading unsecure content. Loading an entire site across HTTPS can make a more social web application rather difficult. In my case, my order page has no social integration, but the rest of the site does, so all but the order page needs to be in HTTP for the benefit of "The Social Web"™ –  Wesley Jun 6 '13 at 20:28
    
@WesleyDavid You have absolutely valid point here. I'm working with eCommerce sites mostly. And checkout + customer account is social/sharing-free -- those pages have unique content just for this customer (and quite often, valid for just this point in time) -- sharing is pretty useless here. Plus -- you do NOT want to have ANY script to be able (even potentially) to read your SECURE content. –  LazyOne Jun 6 '13 at 22:07
    
@LazyOne The reason I came across this post was because I'm wanting to do a similar rule to the OP in this question, but having some troubles. For the interested: webmasters.stackexchange.com/q/49316/568 –  Wesley Jun 6 '13 at 22:15

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