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I want to modify a field of a struct which is inside an array without having to set entire struct. In the example below, I want to set one field of element 543 in the array. I don't want to have to copy entire element (because copying MassiveStruct would hurt performance).

class P
{
    struct S
    {
      public int a;
      public MassiveStruct b;
    }

    void f(ref S s)
    {
      s.a = 3;
    }

    public static void Main()
    {
      S[] s = new S[1000];
      f(ref s[543]);  // Error: An object reference is required for the non-static field, method, or property
    }
}

Is there a way to do it in C#? Or do I always have to copy entire struct out of array, modify the copy, and then put the modified copy back into array.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The only problem is that you're trying to call an instance method from a static method, without an instance of P.

Make f a static method (or create an instance of P on which to call it) and it'll be fine. It's all about reading the compiler error :)

Having said that, I would strongly advise you to:

  • Avoid creating massive structs if at all possible
  • Avoid creating mutable structs if at all possible
  • Avoid public fields
share|improve this answer
    
Of course, you're right. Me stupid. –  kaalus Aug 20 '11 at 18:44
    
As for the advice - I agree. But in my case, the struct in question is private to a class, and it is a part of high performance algorithm with tight loops, so I feel I'm excused with this. –  kaalus Aug 20 '11 at 20:35
    
@kaalus: Massive structs will often perform worse than classes. It depends what you're doing with it - but I agree that if the evil is contained within a very small scope, it's at least somewhat better :) –  Jon Skeet Aug 20 '11 at 20:36
    
@JonSkeet: Massive so-called "immutable" structs have to get redundantly copied all over the place and perform badly. Open-field structs which are passed-by ref whenever possible, and are only get copied when it's necessary to take a snapshot of their value, perform very well; in many cases, the bigger they are, the greater the performance advantages compared with immutable class types. –  supercat Jan 11 '13 at 21:07
    
@supercat: As I've said many, many times - I think we'll have to agree to disagree about the merits of mutable structs like that. –  Jon Skeet Jan 11 '13 at 22:58

After many years of wrestling with this exact problem, I'll summarize the few techniques and solutions I have found. Stylistic tastes aside, arrays of structs are really the only bulk storage method available in C#. If your app truly processes millions of medium-sized objects under high throughput conditions, there is little other choice.

I agree with kaalus that object headers and GC pressure can quickly mount; my grammar processing system, can manipulate 8-10 gigabytes (or more) of structural analyses in less than a minute when parsing or generating lengthy natural language sentences. Cue the chorus of "C# isn't meant for these problems, switch to assembly language, wire-wrap up a FPGA, etc." Instead let's run some tests.

First of all, it is critical to have total understanding of the full spectrum of value type (struct) management issues and the class vs. struct tradeoff sweet-spots. Also of course boxing, pinning/unsafe code, fixed buffers, GCHandle, IntPtr, and more, but most importantly of all in my opinion, wise use of managed pointers.

Your mastery of this topic will also include knowledge of the fact that, should you happen to include in your struct one or more references to managed types (as opposed to just blittable primitives), then your options for accessing the struct with unsafe pointers are greatly reduced. This is not a problem for the managed pointer method I'll mention below. So generally, including object references is fine and doesn't change much regarding this discussion.

Oh, and if you do really need to preserve your unsafe access, you can use a GCHandle in 'Normal' mode to store object reference(s) in your struct indefinitely. Fortunately, putting the GCHandle into your struct does not trigger the unsafe-access prohibition. (Note that GCHandle is itself a value-type, and you can even define and go to town with

var gch = GCHandle.Alloc("spookee",GCHandleType.Normal);
GCHandle* p = &gch;
String s = (String)p->Target;

...and so forth. As a value type, the GCHandle is imaged directly into your struct, but obviously any reference types it stores are not. They are out in the heap, not included in the physical layout of your array. Finally on GCHandle, beware of its copy-semantics, though, because you'll have a memory leak if you don't eventually Free each GCHandle you allocate.

Ani reminds us that some people consider mutable structs "evil," but it's really the fact that they are accident prone that's the problem. Indeed the example provided above

s[543].a = 3;

is exactly what we're trying to achieve: access our data records in-situ. (Note that the syntax for a jagged array is identical, but I'm specifically discussing only non-jagged arrays of user-defined value types here.) For my own programs, I generally consider it a severe bug if I encounter an oversized blittable struct that has (accidentally) been wholly imaged out of its array storage row. As far as how big (wide) your struct can or should be, it won't matter, because you are going to be careful never to let them migrate out of the array. It's easy enough to define a struct to overlay our array (actually, thinking of the struct as a vacuous "memory template"--as opposed to a data container, encapsulator--encourages the right thinking.)

public struct rec
{
    public int a, b, c, d, e, f;
}

This one has 6 ints for a total of 24 bytes. You'll want to consider and be aware of packing options to obtain an alignment-friendly size. But excessive padding can cut into your memory budget: because a more important consideration is the 85,000 byte limit on non-LOH objects. Make sure your record size multiplied by the expected number of rows does not exceed this limit.

So for this example, you would be best advised to keep your array of recs to no more 3,000 rows each. Hopefully your application can be designed around this sweet-spot. This is not so limiting when you remember that--alternatively--each row would be a separate garbage-collected object, instead of just the one array. You've cut your object proliferation by a three orders of magnitude, which is good for a day's work. Thus the .NET environment here is strongly steering us with a pretty specific constraint: it seems that if you target your app's memory design towards monolithic allocations in the 30-70 KB range, then you really can get away with lots and lots of them, and in fact you'll instead become limited by a thornier set of performance bottlenecks (namely, bandwidth on the hardware bus).

So now you have a single .NET reference type (array) with 3,000 6-tuples in physically contiguous tabular storage. First and foremost, we must be super-careful to never "pick up" one of the structs. As Jon Skeet notes above, "Massive structs will often perform worse than classes," and this is absolutely correct. There's no better way to paralyze your memory bus than to start throwing plump value types around willy-nilly.

So let's capitalize on an infrequently-mentioned aspect of the array of structs: All objects (and fields of those objects or structs) of all rows of the entire array are always initialized to their default values. You can start plugging values in, one at a time, in any row or column (field), anywhere in the array. You can leave some fields at their default values, or replace neighbor fields without disturbing one in the middle. Gone is that annoying manual initialization required with stack-resident (local variable) structs before use.

Sometimes it's hard to maintain the field-by-field approach because .NET is always trying to get us to blast in an entire new'd-up struct--but to me, this so-called "initialization" is just a violation of our taboo (against plucking the whole struct out of the array), in a different guise.

Now we get to the crux of the matter. Clearly, accessing your tabular data in-situ minimizes data-shuffling busywork. But often this is an inconvenient hassle. Array accesses can be slow in .NET, due to bounds-checking. So how do you maintain a "working" pointer into the interior of an array, so as to avoid having the system constantly recomputing the indexing offsets.

Evaluation

Let's evaluate the performance of five different methods for the manipulation of individual fields within value-type array storage rows. The test below is designed to measure the efficiency of intensively accessing the data fields of a struct positioned at some array index, in situ--that is, "where they lie," without extracting or rewriting the entire struct (array element). Five different access methods are compared, with all other factors held the same.

The five methods are as follows:

  1. Normal, direct array access via square-brackets and the field specifier dot. Note that, in .NET, arrays are a special and unique primitive of the Common Type System. As Ani mentions above, this syntax cannot be used to change an individual field of a reference instance, such as a list, even when it is parameterized with a value-type.
  2. Using the undocumented __makeref C# language keyword.
  3. Managed pointer via a delegate which uses the ref keyword
  4. "Unsafe" pointers
  5. Same as #3, but using an C# function instead of a delegate.

Before I give the C# test results, here's the test harness implementation. These tests were run on .NET 4.5, an AnyCPU release build running on x64, Workstation gc. (Note that, because the test isn't interested the efficiency of allocating and de-allocating the array itself, the LOH consideration mentioned above does not apply.)

const int num_test = 100000;
static rec[] s1, s2, s3, s4, s5;
static long t_n, t_r, t_m, t_u, t_f;
static Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
static Random rnd = new Random();

static void test2()
{
    s1 = new rec[num_test];
    s2 = new rec[num_test];
    s3 = new rec[num_test];
    s4 = new rec[num_test];
    s5 = new rec[num_test];

    for (int x, i = 0; i < 5000000; i++)
    {
        x = rnd.Next(num_test);
        test_m(x); test_n(x); test_r(x); test_u(x); test_f(x);
        x = rnd.Next(num_test);
        test_n(x); test_r(x); test_u(x); test_f(x); test_m(x);
        x = rnd.Next(num_test);
        test_r(x); test_u(x); test_f(x); test_m(x); test_n(x);
        x = rnd.Next(num_test);
        test_u(x); test_f(x); test_m(x); test_n(x); test_r(x);
        x = rnd.Next(num_test);
        test_f(x); test_m(x); test_n(x); test_r(x); test_u(x);
        x = rnd.Next(num_test);
    }
    Debug.Print("Normal (subscript+field):          {0,18}", t_n);
    Debug.Print("Typed-reference:                   {0,18}", t_r);
    Debug.Print("C# Managed pointer: (ref delegate) {0,18}", t_m);
    Debug.Print("C# Unsafe pointer:                 {0,18}", t_u);
    Debug.Print("C# Managed pointer: (ref func):    {0,18}", t_f);
}

Because the code fragments which implement the test for each specific method are long-ish, I'll give the results first. Time is 'ticks;' lower means better.

Normal (subscript+field):             20,804,691
Typed-reference:                      30,920,655
Managed pointer: (ref delegate)       18,777,666   // <- a close 2nd
Unsafe pointer:                       22,395,806
Managed pointer: (ref func):          18,767,179   // <- winner

I was surprised that these results were so unequivocal. TypedReferences are slowest, presumably because they lug around type information along with the pointer. Considering the heft of the IL-code for the belabored "Normal" version, it performed surprisingly well. Mode transitions seem to hurt unsafe code to the point where you really have to justify, plan, and measure each place you're going to deploy it.

But the hands down fastest times are achieved by leveraging the ref keyword in functions' parameter passing for the purpose of pointing to an interior part of the array, thus eliminating the "per-field-access" array indexing computation. Perhaps the design of my test favors this one, but the test scenarios are representative of empirical use patterns in my app. What surprised my about those numbers is that the advantage of staying in managed mode--while having your pointers, too--was not cancelled by having to call a function or invoke through a delegate. Which reminds me of a crucial point:

Do not "close over" any local variables (that is, refer to variables which are outside the lambda function, from within its body), or do anything else that will bar your delegate instance from being static. If a local variable happens to fall into your lambda and the lambda thus gets promoted to an instance/class, you'll probably notice a difference as it tries to create five million delegates.

Fastet one: (And perhaps simplest too?)

static void f(ref rec e)
{
    e.a = 4;
    e.e = e.a;
    e.b = e.d;
    e.f = e.d;
    e.b = e.e;
    e.a = e.c;
    e.b = 5;
    e.d = e.f;
    e.c = e.b;
    e.e = e.a;
    e.b = e.d;
    e.f = e.d;
    e.c = 6;
    e.b = e.e;
    e.a = e.c;
    e.d = e.f;
    e.c = e.b;
    e.e = e.a;
    e.d = 7;
    e.b = e.d;
    e.f = e.d;
    e.b = e.e;
    e.a = e.c;
    e.d = e.f;
    e.e = 8;
    e.c = e.b;
    e.e = e.a;
    e.b = e.d;
    e.f = e.d;
    e.b = e.e;
    e.f = 9;
    e.a = e.c;
    e.d = e.f;
    e.c = e.b;
    e.e = e.a;
    e.b = e.d;
    e.a = 10;
    e.f = e.d;
    e.b = e.e;
    e.a = e.c;
    e.d = e.f;
    e.c = e.b;
}
static void test_f(int ix)
{
    long q = sw.ElapsedTicks;
    f(ref s5[ix]);
    t_f += sw.ElapsedTicks - q;
}

But it has the disadvantage that you can't keep related logic together in your program. But we can have that back with only a tiny sacrifice in performance. It's basically similar to the foregoing, but written with a lambda function. To use the ref keyword, you must use the old explicit delegates from .NET's very early days. So put this declaration in your program:

delegate void b(ref rec ee);

...and then you can ref into an array element anywhere in your program, inline:

static void test_m(int ix)
{
    long q = sw.ElapsedTicks;
    /// the element to manipulate "e", is selected at the bottom of this lambda block
    ((b)((ref rec e) =>
    {
        e.a = 4;
        e.e = e.a;
        e.b = e.d;
        e.f = e.d;
        e.b = e.e;
        e.a = e.c;
        e.b = 5;
        e.d = e.f;
        e.c = e.b;
        e.e = e.a;
        e.b = e.d;
        e.f = e.d;
        e.c = 6;
        e.b = e.e;
        e.a = e.c;
        e.d = e.f;
        e.c = e.b;
        e.e = e.a;
        e.d = 7;
        e.b = e.d;
        e.f = e.d;
        e.b = e.e;
        e.a = e.c;
        e.d = e.f;
        e.e = 8;
        e.c = e.b;
        e.e = e.a;
        e.b = e.d;
        e.f = e.d;
        e.b = e.e;
        e.f = 9;
        e.a = e.c;
        e.d = e.f;
        e.c = e.b;
        e.e = e.a;
        e.b = e.d;
        e.a = 10;
        e.f = e.d;
        e.b = e.e;
        e.a = e.c;
        e.d = e.f;
        e.c = e.b;
    }))(ref s3[ix]);
    t_m += sw.ElapsedTicks - q;
}

Also, although it may look like a new lambda function is being instantiated on each call, this does not actually happen. As long as you keep the lambda function clear of side-effects, there won't be multiple instances; what's happening here is that, whenever C# determines that a lambda has no non-explicit dependencies, it lazily creates (and caches) a static singleton. It's a little unfortunate that a performance alternation this drastic hidden from our view as a silent optimization. Overall, I like this method. It's fast and clutter-free--except for the bizarre parentheses, none of which can be omitted here.

For completeness, here are the rest of the tests: normal bracketing-plus-dot; TypedReference; and unsafe pointers.

static void test_n(int ix)
{
    long q = sw.ElapsedTicks;
    s1[ix].a = 4;
    s1[ix].e = s1[ix].a;
    s1[ix].b = s1[ix].d;
    s1[ix].f = s1[ix].d;
    s1[ix].b = s1[ix].e;
    s1[ix].a = s1[ix].c;
    s1[ix].b = 5;
    s1[ix].d = s1[ix].f;
    s1[ix].c = s1[ix].b;
    s1[ix].e = s1[ix].a;
    s1[ix].b = s1[ix].d;
    s1[ix].f = s1[ix].d;
    s1[ix].c = 6;
    s1[ix].b = s1[ix].e;
    s1[ix].a = s1[ix].c;
    s1[ix].d = s1[ix].f;
    s1[ix].c = s1[ix].b;
    s1[ix].e = s1[ix].a;
    s1[ix].d = 7;
    s1[ix].b = s1[ix].d;
    s1[ix].f = s1[ix].d;
    s1[ix].b = s1[ix].e;
    s1[ix].a = s1[ix].c;
    s1[ix].d = s1[ix].f;
    s1[ix].e = 8;
    s1[ix].c = s1[ix].b;
    s1[ix].e = s1[ix].a;
    s1[ix].b = s1[ix].d;
    s1[ix].f = s1[ix].d;
    s1[ix].b = s1[ix].e;
    s1[ix].f = 9;
    s1[ix].a = s1[ix].c;
    s1[ix].d = s1[ix].f;
    s1[ix].c = s1[ix].b;
    s1[ix].e = s1[ix].a;
    s1[ix].b = s1[ix].d;
    s1[ix].a = 10;
    s1[ix].f = s1[ix].d;
    s1[ix].b = s1[ix].e;
    s1[ix].a = s1[ix].c;
    s1[ix].d = s1[ix].f;
    s1[ix].c = s1[ix].b;
    t_n += sw.ElapsedTicks - q;
}


static void test_r(int ix)
{
    long q = sw.ElapsedTicks;
    var tr = __makeref(s2[ix]);
    __refvalue(tr, rec).a = 4;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).e = __refvalue( tr, rec).a;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).b = __refvalue( tr, rec).d;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).f = __refvalue( tr, rec).d;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).b = __refvalue( tr, rec).e;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).a = __refvalue( tr, rec).c;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).b = 5;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).d = __refvalue( tr, rec).f;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).c = __refvalue( tr, rec).b;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).e = __refvalue( tr, rec).a;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).b = __refvalue( tr, rec).d;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).f = __refvalue( tr, rec).d;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).c = 6;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).b = __refvalue( tr, rec).e;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).a = __refvalue( tr, rec).c;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).d = __refvalue( tr, rec).f;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).c = __refvalue( tr, rec).b;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).e = __refvalue( tr, rec).a;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).d = 7;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).b = __refvalue( tr, rec).d;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).f = __refvalue( tr, rec).d;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).b = __refvalue( tr, rec).e;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).a = __refvalue( tr, rec).c;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).d = __refvalue( tr, rec).f;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).e = 8;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).c = __refvalue( tr, rec).b;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).e = __refvalue( tr, rec).a;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).b = __refvalue( tr, rec).d;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).f = __refvalue( tr, rec).d;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).b = __refvalue( tr, rec).e;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).f = 9;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).a = __refvalue( tr, rec).c;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).d = __refvalue( tr, rec).f;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).c = __refvalue( tr, rec).b;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).e = __refvalue( tr, rec).a;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).b = __refvalue( tr, rec).d;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).a = 10;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).f = __refvalue( tr, rec).d;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).b = __refvalue( tr, rec).e;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).a = __refvalue( tr, rec).c;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).d = __refvalue( tr, rec).f;
    __refvalue(tr, rec).c = __refvalue( tr, rec).b;
    t_r += sw.ElapsedTicks - q;
}

static void test_u(int ix)
{
    long q = sw.ElapsedTicks;

    fixed (rec* p = &s4[ix])
    {
        p->a = 4;
        p->e = p->a;
        p->b = p->d;
        p->f = p->d;
        p->b = p->e;
        p->a = p->c;
        p->b = 5;
        p->d = p->f;
        p->c = p->b;
        p->e = p->a;
        p->b = p->d;
        p->f = p->d;
        p->c = 6;
        p->b = p->e;
        p->a = p->c;
        p->d = p->f;
        p->c = p->b;
        p->e = p->a;
        p->d = 7;
        p->b = p->d;
        p->f = p->d;
        p->b = p->e;
        p->a = p->c;
        p->d = p->f;
        p->e = 8;
        p->c = p->b;
        p->e = p->a;
        p->b = p->d;
        p->f = p->d;
        p->b = p->e;
        p->f = 9;
        p->a = p->c;
        p->d = p->f;
        p->c = p->b;
        p->e = p->a;
        p->b = p->d;
        p->a = 10;
        p->f = p->d;
        p->b = p->e;
        p->a = p->c;
        p->d = p->f;
        p->c = p->b;
    }
    t_u += sw.ElapsedTicks - q;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice post. It peeves me that many people seem to think that structs should behave like classes, and those which don't are "evil". The part of the MSDN guidelines that suggests one should use classes for things which hold more than one logically distinct part seems particularly heinous; while those are the type of things where the semantics of open-field structs differ the most from those of classes, they're also the things where such structs offer the biggest advantage. –  supercat Jan 11 '13 at 20:56
    
Thanks. A more detailed treatment of my observations on arrays of CLI values types can be found starting on p.38 of glennslayden.com/pubs/slayden-2012-array-TFS.pdf –  Glenn Slayden Mar 7 at 7:20
    
Although arrays are the only type which can expose an "outward-facing" byref, it would be possible for a user collection type to allow byref access to its contents by exposing a method which accepts the data required to access the contents, a (possibly static) delegate, one or more byref parameters for that delegate. Thus, one could say for example myCollection.OperateOnItem(index, (ref Point pt, ref int x) => pt.x = x, ref x); The syntax ends up pretty heinous, but no object allocations are required. –  supercat Mar 7 at 16:23
    
If the called method will need to manipulate variables within the caller's tack frame, such variables may be hoisted to a struct. Unlike closures which alter the semantics of stack variables and replace them with heap-stored objects, hoisting variables into an exposed-field struct doesn't significantly affect performance or behavior. In most cases, a single ref parameter on OperateOnItem will suffice. I'm not sure what the exact performance implications of the method's generic parameter, though, since generics are sometimes dispatched efficiently and sometimes not, and... –  supercat Mar 7 at 16:26
    
...I don't know what factors affect that. Still, there are times when a single unified array might not be a suitable storage representation, and one may wish to hide the details of how things are actually stored, but one would still need to be able to operate on value types in situ; the OperateOnItem pattern may be helpful in such cases. –  supercat Mar 7 at 16:30

While Jon Skeet is correct about why your program doesn't compile, you can just do:

s[543].a = 3;

...and it will operate directly on the struct in the array rather than on a copy.

Note that this idea works for arrays only, other collections such as lists will return a copy out from the indexer-getter (giving you a compiler error if you try something similar on the resulting value).

On another note, mutable structs are considered evil. Is there a strong reason why you don't want to make S a class?

share|improve this answer
3  
The reason why I don't want to make it a class is that I will have millions of them in my arrays and I don't want to overwhelm GC or pay extra memory cost of object headers. –  kaalus Aug 20 '11 at 20:33

You could try to use a forwarding empty struct which does not hold the actual data but only keeps an index to a dataprovider object. This way you can store huge amounts of data without complicating the object graph. I am very certain that it should be quite easy in your case to replace your giant struct with a forwarding emtpy struct as long as you do not try to marshal it into unmanaged code.

Have a look at this struct. It can contain as much data inside it as you wish. The trick is that you do store the actual data in another object. This way you get reference semantics and the advantages of structs which consume less memory than class objects and faster GC cycles due to a simpler object graph (if you have many instances (millions) of them around).

    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack=1)]
    public struct ForwardingEmptyValueStruct
    {
        int _Row;
        byte _ProviderIdx;


        public ForwardingEmptyValueStruct(byte providerIdx, int row)
        {
            _ProviderIdx = providerIdx;
            _Row = row;
        }

        public double V1
        {
            get { return DataProvider._DataProviders[_ProviderIdx].Value1[_Row];  }
        }

        public int V2
        {
            get { return DataProvider._DataProviders[_ProviderIdx].Value2[_Row];  }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
It's worth noting that manually-allocated array slots are often a type of unmanaged resource, even though the arrays containing them are a managed resource type. Consequently, code must take care to release any array slots it no longer needs, since slots which are no longer used would otherwise constitute a memory leak. –  supercat Jun 3 '13 at 17:29

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