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I'm currently looking at the smallpt code by Keavin Beason. I compiled the code with what it says on the tin using g++ -O3 -fopenmp smallpt.cpp, and I'm running into what seems like either an infinite loop or a deadlock.

Compiling the code using just g++ -O3 smallpt.cpp produces the images seen on his page, but I can't get the OpenMP parallelization to work at all.

For reference, I'm compiling on a Windows 7 64-bit machine using Cygwin with GCC 4.5.0. The author himself has stated he's run the same exact code and has run into no issues whatsoever, but I can't get the program to actually exit when it's done tracing the image.

Could this be an issue with my particular compiler and environment, or am I doing something wrong here? Here's the particular snippet of code that's parallelized using OpenMP. I've only modified it with some minor formatting to make it more readable.


int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  int w=1024, h=768, samps = argc==2 ? atoi(argv[1])/4 : 1;

  Ray cam(Vec(50,52,295.6), Vec(0,-0.042612,-1).norm()); // cam pos, dir
  Vec cx=Vec(w*.5135/h);
  Vec cy=(cx%cam.d).norm()*.5135, r, *c=new Vec[w*h];

  #pragma omp parallel for schedule(dynamic, 1) private(r)       // OpenMP
  for (int y=0; y<h; y++)                       // Loop over image rows
  {
    fprintf(stderr,"\rRendering (%d spp) %5.2f%%",samps*4,100.*y/(h-1));
    for (unsigned short x=0, Xi[3]={0,0,y*y*y}; x<w; x++)   // Loop cols
    {
      for (int sy=0, i=(h-y-1)*w+x; sy<2; sy++)     // 2x2 subpixel rows
      {
        for (int sx=0; sx<2; sx++, r=Vec())        // 2x2 subpixel cols
        {
          for (int s=0; s<samps; s++)
          {
            double r1=2*erand48(Xi), dx=r1<1 ? sqrt(r1)-1: 1-sqrt(2-r1);
            double r2=2*erand48(Xi), dy=r2<1 ? sqrt(r2)-1: 1-sqrt(2-r2);
            Vec d = cx*( ( (sx+.5 + dx)/2 + x)/w - .5) +
                    cy*( ( (sy+.5 + dy)/2 + y)/h - .5) + cam.d;
            r = r + radiance(Ray(cam.o+d*140,d.norm()),0,Xi)*(1./samps);
          } // Camera rays are pushed ^^^^^ forward to start in interior
          c[i] = c[i] + Vec(clamp(r.x),clamp(r.y),clamp(r.z))*.25;
        }
      }
    }
  }

  /*  PROBLEM HERE!
      The code never seems to reach here
      PROBLEM HERE!
  */
  FILE *f = fopen("image.ppm", "w");         // Write image to PPM file.
  fprintf(f, "P3\n%d %d\n%d\n", w, h, 255);
  for (int i=0; i<w*h; i++)
    fprintf(f,"%d %d %d ", toInt(c[i].x), toInt(c[i].y), toInt(c[i].z));
}

Here's the output that the program produces, when it runs to completion:

$ time ./a
Rendering (4 spp) 100.00%spp)  spp)   00..0026%%

The following is the most basic code that can reproduce the above behavior

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cmath>

struct Vector
{
  double x, y, z;
  Vector() : x(0), y(0), z(0) {}
};

int toInt(double x)
{
  return (int)(255 * x);
}

double clamp(double x)
{
  if (x < 0) return 0;
  if (x > 1) return 1;
  return x;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  int w = 1024;
  int h = 768;
  int samples = 1;

  Vector r, *c = new Vector[w * h];

  #pragma omp parallel for schedule(dynamic, 1) private(r)
  for (int y = 0; y < h; y++)
  {
    fprintf(stderr,"\rRendering (%d spp) %5.2f%%",samples * 4, 100. * y / (h - 1));
    for (unsigned short x = 0, Xi[3]= {0, 0, y*y*y}; x < w; x++)
    {
      for (int sy = 0, i = (h - y - 1) * w + x; sy < 2; sy++)
      {
        for (int sx = 0; sx < 2; sx++, r = Vector())
        {
          for (int s = 0; s < samples; s++)
          {
            double r1 = 2 * erand48(Xi), dx = r1 < 1 ? sqrt(r1) - 1 : 1 - sqrt(2 - r1);
            double r2 = 2 * erand48(Xi), dy = r2 < 1 ? sqrt(r2) - 1 : 1 - sqrt(2 - r2);
            r.x += r1;
            r.y += r2;
          }

          c[i].x += clamp(r.x) / 4;
          c[i].y += clamp(r.y) / 4;
        }
      }
    }
  }

  FILE *f = fopen("image.ppm", "w");         // Write image to PPM file.
  fprintf(f, "P3\n%d %d\n%d\n", w, h, 255);
  for (int i=0; i<w*h; i++)
    fprintf(f,"%d %d %d ", toInt(c[i].x), toInt(c[i].y), toInt(c[i].z));
}

This is the output obtained from the following sample program:

$ g++ test.cpp
$ ./a
Rendering (4 spp) 100.00%

$ g++ test.cpp -fopenmp
$ ./a
Rendering (4 spp) 100.00%spp)  spp)   00..0052%%
share|improve this question
    
Hmm. Looks OKish. Does anything get printed out in the openmp version? the random sequence is going to be different for the openmp version (erand48). Does openmp work at all with this compiler? Can you try some simpler calculation? –  Guy Sirton Aug 21 '11 at 1:28
    
@Guy Sirton: Yes, I added the exact output I get from compiling with OpenMP at the bottom of the post. I'd like to try some simpler calculation but the code is bare bones as is, and it seems like several other people have verified this works. In regards to what compiler this should work on, the author states that only GCC 4.2 or higher supports OpenMP. –  Mike Bantegui Aug 21 '11 at 1:35
    
@Guy Sirton: I've added a simplified version of the above that can reproduce the behavior. –  Mike Bantegui Aug 21 '11 at 1:54
    
FWIW the code does terminate using OpenMP with Visual Studio 2010 - Had to make some minor changes though to compile. did you try moving the fprintf out of the loop? i'd also experiment declaring r inside the loop rather than using the private directive. Just trying to tickle the compiler to see what's going wrong. –  Guy Sirton Aug 21 '11 at 2:43
    
I'll try both of those. I have no issues with compiling this in visual studio instead. I only tried cygwin as that was convenient to do without creating a new project. –  Mike Bantegui Aug 21 '11 at 2:59
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

fprintf is not guarded by a critical section or a #pragma omp single/master. I wouldn't be surprised if on Windows this thing messes up the console.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This fixed it. I've never worked with OMP before so this is kind of new territory for me. –  Mike Bantegui Sep 22 '11 at 16:28
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