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I am looking to make this statement work in a VB.net page:

<asp:TemplateField HeaderStyle-CssClass="TableHeader" >
<ItemStyle Width="30px" />
<ItemTemplate>
<asp:CheckBox runat="server" ID="cbxClientsActive" 
 Text='<%# Eval("Inactive").ToString().Equals("True") ? " Not Active " : " Active " %>'
 checked='<%#Eval("Inactive")%>'/>
</ItemTemplate>
</asp:TemplateField>

The ternary operator is causing a error: Compiler Error Message: BC36637: The '?' character cannot be used here.

I want to use a tenary operator to display text based on the the field Inactive containing a true or false text value.

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3  
That's not javascript –  Nico Aug 20 '11 at 18:52
    
The eval() function is not javascript? w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_eval.asp –  enigmaspade Aug 20 '11 at 19:01
    
Since the embedded script code in an Asp.net page can be in multiple languages (typically c# or vb.net, but could be others) it's hard to help you when you are not providing info on which language you're using. There should be a language="c#" or similar at the top of the page. –  Jonas H Aug 20 '11 at 19:11
    
It is a Vb.net page. I know I can get around the error by making a javascript function, my question is how to make the Tenary operator work in this statement. If I can find a way it will help in many other areas simular to this. Still I do not understand what that has to do this particular issue in a gridview. –  enigmaspade Aug 20 '11 at 19:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is server side script code and must be written in VB.NET if the page is in that language. There is no ? operator, use the If operator instead.

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That makes sense, the ? is what I use in C and am most familuar with. I did not think to make that connection. Oh the joy of learning VB.net programming. –  enigmaspade Aug 20 '11 at 19:18
1  
–1 … IIf is deprecated. Use the ternary If operator instead, it corresponds exactly to C#’s conditional operator. –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 20 '11 at 19:19
    
Good point @Konrad, just figured out that IIF doesn't support short circuit :/ –  Jonas H Aug 20 '11 at 19:23
    
@Konrad, Thank you for pointing that out. It is working as intended now. –  enigmaspade Aug 20 '11 at 19:24

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