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Is it better to only create an instance variable for a control or an instance variable with a property in objective c/xcode?

If you are to create a property is it best to make it atomic or nonatomic (for a control).

For example, what is the best practice for doing the following:

@interface blah
{
  UILabel *label;
}

@property (nonatomic, retain) IBOutlet UILabel *label;

OR

@interface blah
{
  IBOutlet UILabel *label;
}

OR

@interface blah
{    
  UILabel *label;
}

@property (retain) IBOutlet UILabel *label;

Then when I dealloc is it best to do:

[self.label release]

or [label release]

EDIT:

So to summarize...

  1. When referencing controls in you code, you should use instance variables
  2. In dealloc, you can release the controls by [iVal release]\
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I wouldn't create a property for label since it doesn't need to be accessed outside of UIViewController, hence I'd use second case. The thing regarding atomicity - logic dictates that since UI should be updated from main thread only, UILabel should be accessed only in main thread too. So it virtually doesn't matter if you declare your property nonatomic or atomic, you'd access and alter that UILabel var only from main thread.

Performance-wise, nonatomic properties are faster too since access does not need to acquire lock.

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Thanks. So with regards to dealloc...when I do have a property, do I do [self.propName release] or [ival release]? –  user472292 Aug 20 '11 at 19:07
    
I'm also assuming that for an ival, I always need to release in dealloc and do [ival release] –  user472292 Aug 20 '11 at 19:07
    
When you have a property, I'd set it to nil. AFAIK it makes a release automatically, not sure though. Haven't used properties in ages since I manage them via instance variables. –  Eimantas Aug 20 '11 at 19:08
1  
@user472292 Remember the notation self.propName is shorthand for [self propName]; that is, it's just a method call, albeit to an invisible, automatically-generated method. Best practice is don't access properties in your -dealloc method. –  willc2 Aug 20 '11 at 22:35
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If you're using the interface builder, then declaring

IBOutlet UILabel *label;

alerts the IB that there is a label that can be linked. This allows you to modify the label you create in the IB using the pointer label. However, if the label will never need modification, then there is no need to declare it or reference it at all. Simply create it in the IB and leave it at that. In this case there is no need for getter or setter methods, and so no need to use @property or @synthesize at all.

If you're creating and configuring the label entirely programmatically, then there is no need to declare it as an IBOutlet. Just use

UILabel *label;

and then adjust the label as you like in your code. The IB need not know it exists. Then create getter and setter methods if you need them.

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You want to avoid using method calls in your dealloc method. You might run into a condition where your getter accesses another one of your instance variables that may have already been released. It's safer to just release the instance variable.

[label release];

And if you do decide to release via the accessor, then use the following (as stated by fichek):

self.label = nil; 
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