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import java.util.Scanner;

class Test6
{
    public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        int z = 0;
        while (z != 1)
        {
            System.out.print("Please enter your name: ");
            Scanner x = new Scanner (System.in);
            String name = x.nextLine();
            System.out.print("\n"+"So your name is "+name+"?: ");
            Scanner y = new Scanner (System.in);
            String answer = y.nextLine();
            if ((answer == "yes")||(answer == "Yes"));
            {
                z = 1;
            }
        }
        System.out.println("\n"+"Great!");
    }
}
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closed as not a real question by Tim Post Aug 20 '11 at 19:32

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What problem are you having exactly? –  Grant Thomas Aug 20 '11 at 19:12
1  
@Mr. Disappointment The loop never ends? ;-) (Despite what else may occur, it will never, ever "normally" end in that code.) –  user166390 Aug 20 '11 at 19:16
    
@pst: Oh, I thought that a feature, deciding this guy just didn't enjoy dishing out flattery. ;) –  Grant Thomas Aug 20 '11 at 19:18
    
This is a wall of code, not a question. In the future, please provide context beyond the title. –  Tim Post Aug 20 '11 at 19:31
    
@Tim I agree with your general point but that's hardly a wall of code. Perhaps a low ledge... –  Matt Ball Aug 20 '11 at 23:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use String#equals(), not ==. There are many questions on SO about this already.

if ("yes".equals(answer) || "Yes".equals(answer));
{
    z = 1;
}

In your case, String#equalsIgnoreCase() might more suitable:

if ("yes".equalsIgnoreCase(answer));
{
    z = 1;
}

Side note: you're using z like a boolean flag. Instead of using an int, use a boolean.

boolean z = true;
while (z)
{

}
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But why does it matter? ;-) And why is "yes" first? –  user166390 Aug 20 '11 at 19:14
    
I generally prefer to compare with string literals on the left for null safety. –  Matt Ball Aug 20 '11 at 19:16

Use "yes".equalsIgnoreCase(answer).

share|improve this answer
    
Why put "yes" first? –  user166390 Aug 20 '11 at 19:15
    
@pst: Yoda Conditions. –  alpha123 Aug 20 '11 at 19:21
    
But are "Yoda conditions" relevant in Java since it is impossible to mistakenly use assignment when equality is intended (ignoring boolean assignment)? Especially since we are using method calls, not operators... –  maerics Aug 20 '11 at 19:25
    
same answer as @Matt Ball gave: for null safety reason. –  kraftan Aug 20 '11 at 20:51

Use equals or in your case may be equalsIgnoreCase

if(answer.equalsIgnoreCase("yes"))
 {

 }
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You want to have a look at String.equals() or String.equalsIgnoreCase(), e.g. answer.equalsIgnoreCase("yes") or even "yes".equalsIgnoreCase(answer).

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Calling equals("str") on the String object will work.

if(answer.equals("yes") || answer.equals("no"))
{
   z = 1;
}

== compares references with strings, as String in Java is an object.

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You are confusing the concepts of object identity and object equality.

In the Java programming language, the equals operator (==) tests if the left-hand and right-hand operands refer to the same exact object (aka referential equality, or object identity); however, the Object#equals(o) method (which is overridden by the String class) tests if the calling object is "equivalent" to its argument.

Consider these examples:

String s = "foo";
s == s; // => true, because the variable "s" obviously refers
// to the same object as itself.  They are "identical".

On the other hand:

String a = new String("foo");
String b = new String("foo");
a == b; // => false, because there are two separate objects.
// However...
a.equals(b); // => true, because the strings have the same
// character sequences.  They are "equal".
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