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I have a Vector full of longs.

I would like to be able to always call getFirstElement() on a Vector and then perform an action, let's say addToOtherVector(). I want to be able to not worry whether or not there is actually a value to return from my original vector. I think I could do it by overriding addToOtherVector() like so:

//Code to be called when my first vector is not empty
public void addToOtherVector(long s){
    othervector.add(s);
}

//Code to be called when my first vector IS empty
public void addToOtherVector(something???){
    //does nothing
}

but I'm not sure what i need to do for the something, as it won't accept null as a parameter?

The reason I am doing this is because I don't wish to have to check the size of the vector each time I try to retrieve

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7  
Any solution to this problem will inevitably be more complicated than just doing the null check in an if statement... –  Platinum Azure Aug 20 '11 at 20:05
    
Are you saying that you only want to addToOtherVector() if the get(0) on the first vector is not null? –  Kal Aug 20 '11 at 20:17
2  
@James T -- if your first vector does not have any elements, you will get ArrayIndexOutofBoundsException and not null. –  Kal Aug 20 '11 at 20:27
1  
@James T: I think you are seriously confused and should get up to date with current Java practices. Vector is a thing of the past and you should be shot for using it. But to answer your question: the best way to never have to check for null is to make it impossible for your references to be null. The @NotNull annotation really helps here: good IDEs will even check your source code (even incomplete .java file) and report any @NotNull violation in real-time. –  SyntaxT3rr0r Aug 20 '11 at 20:28
1  
@BheshG What? You can't have null as a formal parameter. –  EJP Aug 20 '11 at 21:59

2 Answers 2

Just override the method with a base class. Since Number is the base class to Long, Integer, etc. just use that one :

//Code to be called when my first vector is not empty
public void addToOtherVector(long s){
   othervector.add(s);
}

//Code to be called when my first vector IS empty
public void addToOtherVector(Number s){
   if (s == null) {
       return;
   }
   othervector.add(((Number) s).longValue());
}
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2  
Collections can't hold primitives so your first overload autoboxes to Long. The second method does the null check the op was hoping to avoid. I don't see how this is a solution... –  Kevin Aug 20 '11 at 20:17
    
both method will add long and autoboxing will promote these values to Long. Why/how wouldn't this be a solution? From what i understand, the question is just asking so null would not be added to the vector, which is exactly what this answer does. –  Yanick Rochon Aug 20 '11 at 20:19
    
I think he wants a clever way to not do a null check at all by manipulating the overload mechanism somehow –  Kevin Aug 20 '11 at 20:25
    
well, then the question was/is not clear –  Yanick Rochon Aug 21 '11 at 0:28
import java.util.Vector;
public class Main {

    static Vector otherVector = new Vector();

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Vector originalVector = new Vector();
        originalVector.add(1);
        originalVector.add(null);
        originalVector.add(2);

        for (Object obj : originalVector) {
            addToOtherVector(obj);
        }
    }

    public static void addToOtherVector(long s) {
        otherVector.add(s);
        System.out.println("adding " + s + " to vector");
    }

    public static void addToOtherVector(Object obj) {
        System.out.println("not adding " + obj + " to vector");
    }
}
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