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I am currently trying to parallelize some multigrid code written in Fortran using OpenMP, and I have found that the OpenMP scheduling clauses make a huge impact on performance. Recall that the OpenMP scheduling clauses are static, dynamic, runtime, and guided, and they determine how the work in a loop is divided between threads. For example, an OpenMP parallelized SAXPY loop with a scheduling clause would look like the following:

!$OMP Parallel Do Schedule(Static)
Do i=1,n
    z(i)=a*x(i)+y(i)
End Do 
!$OMP End Parallel Do

Now imagine that we have many parallelized loops in a piece of code, and have no way of determining a priori which of these scheduling clauses will get the program running the fastest. Changing each scheduling clause by hand would be a pain in the ass, so here's what I thought I would do:

Character(Len=10)::sched="Dynamic"

!$OMP Parallel Do Schedule(sched)
Do i=1,n
    z(i)=a*x(i)+y(i)
End Do
!$OMP End Parallel Do

and then I could simply put that character variable 'sched' in every parallelized loop and change them all at once, by say, putting sched="Static", and then do a runtime test to see which one went the fastest! Of course, it doesn't work-at least not with gfortran or the Absoft compiler. So my question is any or all of the following: Why doesn't this work?, How can I get it to work?, or How can I avoid using this construct to solve this problem? Any help is greatly appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

This won't work, as the modes are not really strings, and no variable evaluation is made at this point, I guess. The best thing I can think of, is using a pre-processor like CoCo or the C-Preprocessor to achieve exactly this. However alternatively, you could use the runtime mode and use either the environment variable OMP_SCHEDULE or the omp_set_schedule routine to set the mode.

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Ah thank you! I used the omp_set_schedule routine and it worked like a champ! Well, gfortran 6 doesn't support this routine, but the Absoft compiler does, and gfortran 7-which I don't yet have-claims it will support this routine. But in any case, this is a solved problem in my mind. Your help is greatly appreciated. –  Nick Thompson Aug 21 '11 at 4:37

The scheduling clause that you specify will have a dramatic effect on the way in which the loop is compiled to machine code. Once the code is compiled, the scheduling mode is locked in stone and cannot be changed at runtime. I agree with haraldkl, use a pre-processor.

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