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This relates to a webpage that should show all upcoming events, and mark any that are in the current user's diary.

diary table
diary_id
member_id
event_id

event table
event_id
region_id
...

region table
region_id
...

member table
member_id
...

QUERY:

SELECT event.*, region.name, diary.diary_id 
FROM event, region 
LEFT JOIN diary on diary.member_id = 10 AND diary.event_id = event.event_id
WHERE region.region_id = event.region_id AND `date` >= NOW()

This is returning unknown column event.event_id and I can't figure out why. I'm no SQL whiz but expected this would just work and give me a NULL in the diary_id column for all events that are not in the user's diary

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Can you edit the post to include the actual complete error message, formatted as code? –  Jim Garrison Aug 20 '11 at 21:52
1  
Are you sure the event ID column is named event_id? What do you see if you start up the MySQL client and type describe event;? –  Jim Garrison Aug 20 '11 at 21:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are mixing join syntax. Try this instead.

SELECT event.*,
       region.name,
       diary.diary_id
FROM   event
       INNER JOIN region
         ON region.region_id = event.region_id
       LEFT JOIN diary
         ON diary.member_id = 10
            AND diary.event_id = event.event_id
WHERE  `date` >= NOW()  

Update

Your problem with not finding event_id is because of this FROM event, region. It can't find event_id in the on clause. Change your query as suggested above but it would also be possible to fix it by switching places of the tables to FROM region, event. Don't do that. Use the new join syntax introduced to the SQL language some 20 years ago.

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1  
+1. Basically, when a comma-separated list of tables is followed by a JOIN clause, only the table that immediately precedes the clause takes part in the join, not all of the list. Or, in other words, between these two kinds of operators, the comma join and the JOIN clause, the latter takes precedence over the former. –  Andriy M Aug 21 '11 at 11:57
    
Thanks. Worked. I probably need to learn a bit more about Joins ;-) –  gio Aug 21 '11 at 22:47

Don't put diary.member_id = 10 in the where clause if you want to do the left join. In PL/SQL this will turn your left join into a join without asking you

The below should do better:

SELECT event.*, region.name, diary.diary_id 
FROM event
JOIN region on region.region_id = event.region_id  
LEFT JOIN ( select diary_id, event_id
              from diary 
             where diary.member_id = 10 ) diary
       ON diary.event_id = event.event_id
WHERE `date` >= NOW()
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First of all I wouldn't put diary.member_id = 10 in the Join:

SELECT event.*, region.name, diary.diary_id 
FROM `event`, region 
LEFT JOIN diary ON diary.event_id = event.event_id
WHERE region.region_id = event.region_id AND `date` >= NOW() AND diary.member_id = 10

Are you sure that event.event_id is not event.id?

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1  
If you move diary.member_id = 10 to the where clause you are no longer doing a left outer join against diary. The result will not be the same. –  Mikael Eriksson Aug 20 '11 at 22:24

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