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Say I have nodes connected in the below fashion, how do I arrive at the number of paths that exist between given points, and path details?

1,2 //node 1 and 2 are connected
2,3
2,5
4,2
5,11
11,12
6,7
5,6
3,6
6,8
8,10
8,9

Find the paths from 1 to 7:

Answer: 2 paths found and they are

1,2,3,6,7
1,2,5,6,7

alt text

implementation found here is nice I am going to use the same

Here is the snippet from the above link in python

# a sample graph
graph = {'A': ['B', 'C','E'],
             'B': ['A','C', 'D'],
             'C': ['D'],
             'D': ['C'],
             'E': ['F','D'],
             'F': ['C']}

class MyQUEUE: # just an implementation of a queue

    def __init__(self):
    	self.holder = []

    def enqueue(self,val):
    	self.holder.append(val)

    def dequeue(self):
    	val = None
    	try:
    		val = self.holder[0]
    		if len(self.holder) == 1:
    			self.holder = []
    		else:
    			self.holder = self.holder[1:]	
    	except:
    		pass

    	return val	

    def IsEmpty(self):
    	result = False
    	if len(self.holder) == 0:
    		result = True
    	return result


path_queue = MyQUEUE() # now we make a queue


def BFS(graph,start,end,q):

    temp_path = [start]

    q.enqueue(temp_path)

    while q.IsEmpty() == False:
    	tmp_path = q.dequeue()
    	last_node = tmp_path[len(tmp_path)-1]
    	print tmp_path
    	if last_node == end:
    		print "VALID_PATH : ",tmp_path
    	for link_node in graph[last_node]:
    		if link_node not in tmp_path:
    			#new_path = []
    			new_path = tmp_path + [link_node]
    			q.enqueue(new_path)

BFS(graph,"A","D",path_queue)

-------------results-------------------
['A']
['A', 'B']
['A', 'C']
['A', 'E']
['A', 'B', 'C']
['A', 'B', 'D']
VALID_PATH :  ['A', 'B', 'D']
['A', 'C', 'D']
VALID_PATH :  ['A', 'C', 'D']
['A', 'E', 'F']
['A', 'E', 'D']
VALID_PATH :  ['A', 'E', 'D']
['A', 'B', 'C', 'D']
VALID_PATH :  ['A', 'B', 'C', 'D']
['A', 'E', 'F', 'C']
['A', 'E', 'F', 'C', 'D']
VALID_PATH :  ['A', 'E', 'F', 'C', 'D']
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8 Answers 8

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Breadth-first search traverses a graph and in fact finds all paths from a starting node. Usually, BFS doesn't keep all paths, however. Instead, it updates a prededecessor function π to save the shortest path. You can easily modify the algorithm so that π(n) doesn't only store one predecessor but a list of possible predecessors.

Then all possible paths are encoded in this function, and by traversing π recursively you get all possible path combinations.

One good pseudocode which uses this notation can be found in Introduction to Algorithms by Cormen et al. and has subsequently been used in many University scripts on the subject. A Google search for “BFS pseudocode predecessor π” uproots this first hit.

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1  
is the implementation in question is ok for breadth first search? –  yesraaj Apr 5 '09 at 19:36
    
I'm no Python expert: does the not in operator really exist? Other than that, the code looks OK at a cursory glance. You can remove the new_path = [] statement, though. Also, you can create the queue inside the method and remove it as a parameter. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 6 '09 at 9:09
    
I am just going to convert this to c++ and use it.. Thanks for your input –  yesraaj Apr 6 '09 at 18:15

Do refer this thread as well, I found this more useful and was able to sort out my problem... Graph Algorithm To Find All Connections Between Two Arbitrary Vertices... I personally preferred to use the DFS to get all the paths

share|improve this answer

given the adjacency matrix:

{0, 1, 3, 4, 0, 0}

{0, 0, 2, 1, 2, 0}

{0, 1, 0, 3, 0, 0}

{0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1}

{0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 6}

{0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0}

the following Wolfram Mathematica code solve the problem to find all the simple paths between two nodes of a graph. I used simple recursion, and two global var to keep track of cycles and to store the desired output. the code hasn't been optimized just for the sake of code clarity. the "print" should be helpful to clarify how it works.

cycleQ[l_]:=If[Length[DeleteDuplicates[l]] == Length[l], False, True];
getNode[matrix_, node_]:=Complement[Range[Length[matrix]],Flatten[Position[matrix[[node]], 0]]];

builtTree[node_, matrix_]:=Block[{nodes, posAndNodes, root, pos},
    If[{node} != {} && node != endNode ,
        root = node;
        nodes = getNode[matrix, node];
        (*Print["root:",root,"---nodes:",nodes];*)

        AppendTo[lcycle, Flatten[{root, nodes}]];
        If[cycleQ[lcycle] == True,
            lcycle = Most[lcycle]; appendToTree[root, nodes];,
            Print["paths: ", tree, "\n", "root:", root, "---nodes:",nodes];
            appendToTree[root, nodes];

        ];
    ];

appendToTree[root_, nodes_] := Block[{pos, toAdd},
    pos = Flatten[Position[tree[[All, -1]], root]];
    For[i = 1, i <= Length[pos], i++,
        toAdd = Flatten[Thread[{tree[[pos[[i]]]], {#}}]] & /@ nodes;
        (* check cycles!*)            
        If[cycleQ[#] != True, AppendTo[tree, #]] & /@ toAdd;
    ];
    tree = Delete[tree, {#} & /@ pos];
    builtTree[#, matrix] & /@ Union[tree[[All, -1]]];
    ];
];

to call the code: initNode = 1; endNode = 6; lcycle = {}; tree = {{initNode}}; builtTree[initNode, matrix];

paths: {{1}} root:1---nodes:{2,3,4}

paths: {{1,2},{1,3},{1,4}} root:2---nodes:{3,4,5}

paths: {{1,3},{1,4},{1,2,3},{1,2,4},{1,2,5}} root:3---nodes:{2,4}

paths: {{1,4},{1,2,4},{1,2,5},{1,3,4},{1,2,3,4},{1,3,2,4},{1,3,2,5}} root:4---nodes:{2,3,6}

paths: {{1,2,5},{1,3,2,5},{1,4,6},{1,2,4,6},{1,3,4,6},{1,2,3,4,6},{1,3,2,4,6},{1,4,2,5},{1,3,4,2,5},{1,4,3,2,5}} root:5---nodes:{6}

RESULTS:{{1, 4, 6}, {1, 2, 4, 6}, {1, 2, 5, 6}, {1, 3, 4, 6}, {1, 2, 3, 4, 6}, {1, 3, 2, 4, 6}, {1, 3, 2, 5, 6}, {1, 4, 2, 5, 6}, {1, 3, 4, 2, 5, 6}, {1, 4, 3, 2, 5, 6}}

...Unfortunately I cannot upload images to show the results in a better way :(

http://textanddatamining.blogspot.com

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For those who are not PYTHON expert ,the same code in C++

//@Author :Ritesh Kumar Gupta
#include <stdio.h>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
#include <queue>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
vector<vector<int> >GRAPH(100);
inline void print_path(vector<int>path)
{
    cout<<"[ ";
    for(int i=0;i<path.size();++i)
    {
        cout<<path[i]<<" ";
    }
    cout<<"]"<<endl;
}
bool isadjacency_node_not_present_in_current_path(int node,vector<int>path)
{
    for(int i=0;i<path.size();++i)
    {
        if(path[i]==node)
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
int findpaths(int source ,int target ,int totalnode,int totaledge )
{
    vector<int>path;
    path.push_back(source);
    queue<vector<int> >q;
    q.push(path);

    while(!q.empty())
    {
        path=q.front();
        q.pop();

        int last_nodeof_path=path[path.size()-1];
        if(last_nodeof_path==target)
        {
            cout<<"The Required path is:: ";
            print_path(path);
        }
        else
        {
            print_path(path);
        }

        for(int i=0;i<GRAPH[last_nodeof_path].size();++i)
        {
            if(isadjacency_node_not_present_in_current_path(GRAPH[last_nodeof_path][i],path))
            {

                vector<int>new_path(path.begin(),path.end());
                new_path.push_back(GRAPH[last_nodeof_path][i]);
                q.push(new_path);
            }
        }




    }
    return 1;
}
int main()
{
    //freopen("out.txt","w",stdout);
    int T,N,M,u,v,source,target;
    scanf("%d",&T);
    while(T--)
    {
        printf("Enter Total Nodes & Total Edges\n");
        scanf("%d%d",&N,&M);
        for(int i=1;i<=M;++i)
        {
            scanf("%d%d",&u,&v);
            GRAPH[u].push_back(v);
        }
        printf("(Source, target)\n");
        scanf("%d%d",&source,&target);
        findpaths(source,target,N,M);
    }
    //system("pause");
    return 0;
}

/*
Input::
1
6 11
1 2 
1 3
1 5
2 1
2 3
2 4
3 4
4 3
5 6
5 4
6 3
1 4

output:
[ 1 ]
[ 1 2 ]
[ 1 3 ]
[ 1 5 ]
[ 1 2 3 ]
The Required path is:: [ 1 2 4 ]
The Required path is:: [ 1 3 4 ]
[ 1 5 6 ]
The Required path is:: [ 1 5 4 ]
The Required path is:: [ 1 2 3 4 ]
[ 1 2 4 3 ]
[ 1 5 6 3 ]
[ 1 5 4 3 ]
The Required path is:: [ 1 5 6 3 4 ]


*/
share|improve this answer
    
:can you tell what would be the complexity of the above code?? –  Prashant Jun 17 at 9:32

The original code is a bit cumbersome and you might want to use the collections.deque instead if you want to use BFS to find if a path exists between 2 points on the graph. Here is a quick solution I hacked up:

Note: this method might continue infinitely if there exists no path between the two nodes. I haven't tested all cases, YMMV.

from collections import deque

# a sample graph
  graph = {'A': ['B', 'C','E'],
           'B': ['A','C', 'D'],
           'C': ['D'],
           'D': ['C'],
           'E': ['F','D'],
           'F': ['C']}

   def BFS(start, end):
    """ Method to determine if a pair of vertices are connected using BFS

    Args:
      start, end: vertices for the traversal.

    Returns:
      [start, v1, v2, ... end]
    """
    path = []
    q = deque()
    q.append(start)
    while len(q):
      tmp_vertex = q.popleft()
      if tmp_vertex not in path:
        path.append(tmp_vertex)

      if tmp_vertex == end:
        return path

      for vertex in graph[tmp_vertex]:
        if vertex not in path:
          q.append(vertex)
share|improve this answer

Dijkstra's algorithm applies more to weighted paths and it sounds like the poster was wanting to find all paths, not just the shortest.

For this application, I'd build a graph (your application sounds like it wouldn't need to be directed) and use your favorite search method. It sounds like you want all paths, not just a guess at the shortest one, so use a simple recursive algorithm of your choice.

The only problem with this is if the graph can be cyclic.

With the connections:

  • 1, 2
  • 1, 3
  • 2, 3
  • 2, 4

While looking for a path from 1->4, you could have a cycle of 1 -> 2 -> 3 -> 1.

In that case, then I'd keep a stack as traversing the nodes. Here's a list with the steps for that graph and the resulting stack (sorry for the formatting - no table option):

current node (possible next nodes minus where we came from) [stack]

  1. 1 (2, 3) [1]
  2. 2 (3, 4) [1, 2]
  3. 3 (1) [1, 2, 3]
  4. 1 (2, 3) [1, 2, 3, 1] //error - duplicate number on the stack - cycle detected
  5. 3 () [1, 2, 3] // back-stepped to node three and popped 1 off the stack. No more nodes to explore from here
  6. 2 (4) [1, 2] // back-stepped to node 2 and popped 1 off the stack.
  7. 4 () [1, 2, 4] // Target node found - record stack for a path. No more nodes to explore from here
  8. 2 () [1, 2] //back-stepped to node 2 and popped 4 off the stack. No more nodes to explore from here
  9. 1 (3) [1] //back-stepped to node 1 and popped 2 off the stack.
  10. 3 (2) [1, 3]
  11. 2 (1, 4) [1, 3, 2]
  12. 1 (2, 3) [1, 3, 2, 1] //error - duplicate number on the stack - cycle detected
  13. 2 (4) [1, 3, 2] //back-stepped to node 2 and popped 1 off the stack
  14. 4 () [1, 3, 2, 4] Target node found - record stack for a path. No more nodes to explore from here
  15. 2 () [1, 3, 2] //back-stepped to node 2 and popped 4 off the stack. No more nodes
  16. 3 () [1, 3] // back-stepped to node 3 and popped 2 off the stack. No more nodes
  17. 1 () [1] // back-stepped to node 1 and popped 3 off the stack. No more nodes
  18. Done with 2 recorded paths of [1, 2, 4] and [1, 3, 2, 4]
share|improve this answer

If you want all the paths, use recursion.

Using an adjacency list, preferably, create a function f() that attempts to fill in a current list of visited vertices. Like so:

void allPaths(vector<int> previous, int current, int destination)
{
    previous.push_back(current);

    if (current == destination)
        //output all elements of previous, and return

    for (int i = 0; i < neighbors[current].size(); i++)
    	allPaths(previous, neighbors[current][i], destination);
}

int main()
{
    //...input
    allPaths(vector<int>(), start, end);
}

Due to the fact that the vector is passed by value (and thus any changes made further down in the recursive procedure aren't permanent), all possible combinations are enumerated.

You can gain a bit of efficiency by passing the previous vector by reference (and thus not needing to copy the vector over and over again) but you'll have to make sure that things get popped_back() manually.

One more thing: if the graph has cycles, this won't work. (I assume in this case you'll want to find all simple paths, then) Before adding something into the previous vector, first check if it's already in there.

If you want all shortest paths, use Konrad's suggestion with this algorithm.

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3  
This outputs every path, not just every simple one. For an undirected graph or a cyclic directed graph the code will create paths of increasing length, eventually resulting in a call-stack overflow. It should check whether current is in previous, and stop recursion if it is. –  Christoph Apr 5 '09 at 22:30

What you're trying to do is essentially to find a path between two vertices in a (directed?) graph check out Dijkstra's algorithm if you need shortest path or write a simple recursive function if you need whatever paths exist.

share|improve this answer
    
can you add sample code and explain how to use recursion function here –  yesraaj Apr 3 '09 at 11:33

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