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Mathematica can be used to write very nice documents. Does anyone know if it is possible to write documents with 2 columns? If so, can you provide some examples or links to other notebooks that show this style.

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Not exactly two-columns, but related: Creating "margin" graphics –  Simon Oct 10 '11 at 12:30

3 Answers 3

This apparently used to be possible using the AuthorTools package for version 5 (see this reference in the Mathematica users wiki).

However, there is no such palette in version 8, and neither the "Writing Assistant" palette nor the Option Inspector seem to have a relevant option.

It might be possible to do something using Grid with text-style Cells inside it, but I doubt it would be straightforward.

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Here's a link with Bilateral Cells showing what used to be possible... –  Simon Aug 21 '11 at 5:55
    
I thought about using Grid but like you said, it may not be straight forward. All I want to do is obtain the same styles as some journals. I hope there is an example for MMA8 showing how to create 2 columns with text, math formulas and sample code in there. –  jmlopez Aug 21 '11 at 6:06

I don't think any good implementation of multicolumns are supported in Mathematica - it's not really compatible with the structure of the notebook interface. The fact that publicon does not support proper multiple columns is probably a good hint that Mathematica does not.

Q: Does Publicon support multi-column layout?

Publicon documents are oriented toward a vertical scrolling paradigm much like HTML, rather than a page-by-page configuration found in page-layout programs. Multiple columns can be configured in tables, but not maintained as flows. Publicon's focus is on document structure, allowing clean translation to LaTeX or XML for submission to publishers. Publishers can then use page-layout tools that exploit their own particular formats to generate single- or double-column layouts to their own specifications.

Although, of course, hacks like Bilateral Cells (part of the Author Tools package mentioned in Verbia's answer) and that below can be used.

Here's some code that generates a two column text cell that will resize the columns to the window size - but the text does not flow from one column to another. Once the cell is generated, you can type in it as per normal.

Cell[BoxData[
   GridBox[{{Cell["Column One:\nsome text", "Text"], 
      Cell["Column Two:\nmore text", "Text"]}}, ColumnsEqual -> True, 
    ColumnSpacings -> 2, ColumnAlignments -> Left, 
    ColumnWidths -> Dynamic[First[WindowSize /. Options[EvaluationNotebook[]]]/(2*18)]]], 
  "Text"] // CellPrint

2 col text

Or you can have text on the left an input/output on the right

Cell[BoxData[GridBox[{
     {Cell["Column One:\nsome text", "Text"], Cell[BoxData[RowBox[{"1", "+", "1"}]], "Input"]},
     {"\[SpanFromAbove]", Cell[BoxData["2"], "Output"]}}, 
    ColumnsEqual -> True, ColumnSpacings -> 2, ColumnAlignments -> Left, 
    ColumnWidths -> Dynamic[First[WindowSize /. Options[EvaluationNotebook[]]]/(2*18)]]], 
  "Text"] // CellPrint

2 col in/out

Note that I've only done a dodgy conversion from pixels to em by dividing the former by 18. The true conversion will be system and font dependent. Also, just adding CellLabels to the input and output cells does not work. So the In[n]:= Out[n]= might need to be added manually using a small middle column.

Finally, it should be possible to construct something like the bilateral cell code used by the author tools package that grabs a Text/MathCaption cell followed by an Input and Output cell and combines them into a two-column construction.

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I guess if I can export to Latex and then use the 2 column style would be ok. I did not think of that possibility. Unfortunately I still haven't figured out how to correctly use cross references in mathematica so that it can be exported to latex. I emailed them as you suggested before but they have not answered. I think I'm just going to email the guys at wolfram. I hope someone answers. In any case, I guess it is not possible do create a 2 column document in mathematica. Thanks. –  jmlopez Aug 21 '11 at 6:36

Graphics and Inset can be used for layouts, for example:-

text = StringTake[ExampleData[{"Text", "Prufrock"}], {226, 931}];
columntext1 = StringTake[text, 350];
columntext2 = StringTake[text, {348, 706}];
column1 = Graphics[{White, Rectangle[{0, 0}, {150, 210}], Black,
    Inset[TextCell[columntext1,
      LineSpacing -> {0, 16}, TextJustification -> 1],
     {0, 210}, {Left, Top}, {150, Automatic}]},
   PlotRange -> {{0, 150}, {0, 210}},
   BaseStyle -> {FontFamily -> "Times", 
         FontWeight -> "Plain", FontSize -> 13}];
column2 = Graphics[{White, Rectangle[{0, 0}, {150, 210}], Black,
    Inset[TextCell[columntext2,
      LineSpacing -> {0, 16}, TextJustification -> 1],
     {0, 210}, {Left, Top}, {150, Automatic}]},
   PlotRange -> {{0, 150}, {0, 210}},
   BaseStyle -> {FontFamily -> "Times", 
         FontWeight -> "Plain", FontSize -> 13}];
image = ExampleData[{"TestImage", "House2"}];
clippedimage = Graphics[{Blue, Rectangle[{0, 0}, {500, 270}],
    Inset[image, {250, 170}, {Center, Center}, {512, 512}]},
   PlotRange -> {{0, 500}, {0, 270}}, ImageSize -> 500];
Graphics[{White, Rectangle[{0, 0}, {330, 400}],
  Inset[column1, {75, 295}, {Center, Center}, {150, 210}],
  Inset[column2, {255, 295}, {Center, Center}, {150, 210}],
  Inset[clippedimage, {165, 90}, {Center, Center}, {330, 179}]},
 PlotRange -> {{0, 330}, {0, 400}}, ImageSize -> 330]

enter image description here

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Chris, that seems good, but I don't think that would be very efficient to write documents. What I would like is a way of making mathematica print the document with 2 columns. In this case all we care about is adding content. Using a graphics object is just too much work. –  jmlopez Aug 21 '11 at 17:31
    
@ jmlopez - Yes, not as efficient as word processing. Using Graphics makes it a two stage process: 1. set the text and 2. run the page layout. Also, it's difficult to calculate where to break the text for the two columns. But aside from that it's a useable process. –  Chris Degnen Aug 21 '11 at 18:01
    
Of relevance for automation: measuring text box height. –  Chris Degnen Dec 15 '13 at 8:54

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