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I have two jQuery Ajax calls that I'm combining on a page. I'm stuck on the success: function() in each, as one is success: function(msg) and the other is success: function(data). I'm unsure of what both of these mean, and what they should be in the combined code. I'll place the two calls below, separately, and combined as I have them thus far.

Ajax Request #1: there is a $msg .= "<div class='pagination'><ul>"; on this functions php page. Not sure if that is what this is referring to.

$.ajax
({
    type: "GET",
    url: "new_arrivals_data.php",
    data: "page="+page,
    success: function(msg)
    {
        $("#gallery_container").ajaxComplete(function(event, request, settings)
        {
            gallery_show();
            loading_hide();
            $("#gallery_container").html(msg);
        });
    }
});

Ajax Request #2: As far as I can see, there is no data anywhere on this call's php file. Don't know what function(data) is referring to.

$.get("new_arrivals_data.php",{imgs: value}, function(data){
    $("#gallery_container").html(data);
});

Combined Request: I have put a ? where msg was in the original call as I'm unsure what to put in it's spot.

$.ajax
({
    type: "GET",
    url: "new_arrivals_data.php",
    data: {page:page, imgs: value},
    success: function(?)
    {
        $("#gallery_container").ajaxComplete(function(event, request, settings)
        {
            gallery_show();
            loading_hide();
            $("#gallery_container").html(?);
        });
    }
});
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

msg and data are simply the names of the formal parameters. You use those to refer to the response data that is passed to that function when it is invoked.

You can rename it to any valid JavaScript identifier.

Although there isn't really any reason to call ajaxComplete inside the success: callback:

success: function( whatever_you_want_to_call_it ) {
        gallery_show();
        loading_hide();
        $("#gallery_container").html( whatever_you_want_to_call_it );
}

$.get("new_arrivals_data.php",{imgs: value}, function( i_like_ice_cream ){
    $("#gallery_container").html( i_like_ice_cream );
});

Remember, in both cases, you're passing a function as an argument. That function is invoked when the response is received.

Whatever code is invoking that function, is also passing the response into that function as the first argument so that you have access to it. That's why you defined the parameter.

It's very similar to declaring a variable in a function.

$.get("new_arrivals_data.php",{imgs: value}, function(){

    var i_like_ice_cream = arguments[0];
    $("#gallery_container").html( i_like_ice_cream );

});

This does almost the same thing. You've associated a variable with the first argument passed into your callback function.

share|improve this answer
    
So are you saying it can literally be anything? It doesn't have to have anything to do with the php file? –  stefmikhail Aug 21 '11 at 1:07
    
@stefmikhail: Any valid JavaScript variable name. It doesn't have anything to do with the PHP. It's just like declaring a variable in your function. function(){ var msg = arguments[0]; /*...*/ } would be effectively the same. –  user113716 Aug 21 '11 at 1:10

It can be any valid variable name. Either data or msg will work, just as long as you use the same one within the scope of that function.

To explain, you are setting success to an anonymous function, pretty much just a function with no name. So when jQuery dispatches the success event, it calls the function that you have given it when creating the ajax request. It also passes in some arguments into that function (in this case, the resulting data from the ajax request). What you are defining is what that incoming information should be called in the scope of this new function.

Take the following code for example:

function workOnBob(aWorker) {
   aWorker("Bob")
}

var sayHi = function(name) { alert("Hello " + name); };
var getMarried = function(groom) { alert(groom + " is getting married!"); };

workOnBob(sayHi); // "Hello Bob"
workOnBob(getMarried); // "Bob is getting married!"

You can see that workOnBob is a function, and it should be passed an anonymous function. It invokes that function with the string "Bob". Also, notice the anonymous functions, sayHi and getMarried, have named the arguments they receive differently within their own scope (name and groom respectively). They both get the string "Bob", but they both choose to call it something different.

Anonymous functions and closures can be confusing, but once you get the hang of them, they are a lot of fun.

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Fantastic answer! I understand much better now. Trying to learn all this stuff is tough without knowing anyone who I can ask. Curious, the call from above is all within function loadData(page){}. Does that page mean something different from the explanation above? Later on in the code it is called in the following way: loadData(1). What does this mean? –  stefmikhail Aug 21 '11 at 2:18
    
By the way, Love your username! –  stefmikhail Aug 21 '11 at 2:22

It just a name for the variable containing the response data returned from the ajax call. Name it whatever makes the most sense to the context, to make your code more readable, e.g. html, resp, logged.

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