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I have a Date class

class Date { int dd, mm, yyyy};

I have written the rule of 3, and all that works. I want to convert the Date into a string. Do I need a conversion operator string() to do so? thx!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When I want to make a text representation of an object available, I usually write a (public) print() method that takes a std::ostream&. This makes it easy for me to unit test and it exposes the private data without needing to make friends.

void Date::print(std::ostream& s) const
{
    s << yyyy << "-" << mm << "-" << dd;
}

This makes writing the stream insertion operator that Jesus Ramos suggested nice and simple:

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& s, const Date& d)
{
    d.print(s);
    return s;
}

And if you (really) want a std::string() operator, then that's trivial:

Date::operator std::string() const
{
    std::ostringstream oss;
    print(oss);
    return oss.str();
}
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std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& s, const Date& d)
{
    s << "Format your date object here";
    return s;
}

In C++ you use streams if you want toString() like functionality.

So for example you could do

s << mm << "/" << dd << "/" << yyyy;
share|improve this answer
    
thx Jesus, let me try it out –  itcplpl Aug 21 '11 at 2:07
    
Do you mean ostream here? std::stream is new to me. –  Steve Townsend Aug 21 '11 at 2:10
    
@Steve thanks, must have typoed something. –  Jesus Ramos Aug 21 '11 at 2:11
    
Don't forget to return the std::ostream! –  Johnsyweb Aug 21 '11 at 2:26
    
@Johnsyweb Wow I am forgetting everything today, thanks :) –  Jesus Ramos Aug 21 '11 at 2:28

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