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Looking at the following image:

enter image description here

What tool should I use to get the coordinates of the image section that I want, so that I can use it for example in:

.myimage {
    background-position: -283px -64px;
}

Thanks.

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closed as off-topic by Bill the Lizard Nov 7 '13 at 13:15

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You could use a non-visual grid and place each image in the top left corner of the grid. For example alle fields would be 16 by 16 pixels - then you could calculate the coordinates by yourself. –  kleinfreund Jun 4 '13 at 9:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Nearly any image editor or viewer. Even MS Paint (in Windows 7) will show the coordinates with the Select tool in the lower left.

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ok thank you very much –  Gaetano Aug 21 '11 at 2:55

Try this online tool: http://www.spritecow.com/ Open you png picture, just select the icon, sprite css will be generated automaticly

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cool tool - thanks –  Gaetano Nov 7 '13 at 4:03

If each image were already an exported png or jpg, you could use a tool like locator.codestrict.com to output the coordinates automatically.

You just choose your background image and the cropped images you want to locate and the css top/left is will display. Of course, you'd just have to translate top/left to background-position.

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