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I saw this code in C and run it:

int i,j;
scanf("%d %d"+scanf("%d %d",&i,&j));
printf("%d %d",i,j);

Input:

1 2 3

Output:

3 2

This is quite unexpected (reverse order and three inputs).

Please explain this.

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I get EXC_BAD_ACCESS. –  Pound Aug 21 '11 at 3:15
1  
Confused is right! –  maerics Aug 21 '11 at 3:17
    
@anon: what system and compiler did you use? Certainly this code is not fine, but on some systems it will probably do what the OP says. –  John Zwinck Aug 21 '11 at 3:18
    
What is this I don't even? Anyways, it's getting a return of 2 from the inner scanf, advancing the address of "%d %d" by 2 bytes and then consuming " %d". It's a buffer overflow with odd results (on some machines) and EXEC_BAD_ACCESS on other well guarded memory allocations (probably out of bounds on a virtual memory area or protected access to memory location) –  Jesus Ramos Aug 21 '11 at 3:20
    
@John: Tried it on LLVM 2.0 and GCC 4.2.1 –  Pound Aug 21 '11 at 3:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This:

scanf("%d %d"+scanf("%d %d",&i,&j));

Is horrible code! But what's happening?

First, the inner scanf is called. It stores 1 and 2 into i and j respectively (it should be obvious why this is). It then returns 2, because that is the number of things it stored. That then "skips" the first two characters of the outer scanf's format statement, making it " %d". Then scanf wants to store 3 from the input somewhere, but no pointer to a variable was given in the outer scanf call. So what happens next? It's undefined behavior, but the actual fact is that the second (outer) scanf call is just reusing (or stomping on, if you prefer) the arguments passed to the first (inner) scanf. So 3 is stored in i, and that's it.

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Well i will never use it ... thanks –  Ashish Negi Aug 21 '11 at 3:22
1  
scanf is hard to use completely properly, and easy to get wrong, but the example in your original post is really extremely wrong. I've never seen anything like that, and would like to know where it came from. –  John Zwinck Aug 21 '11 at 3:24
    
well that is like see what happens when you do this or that with code. Well i think that when somebody wrote the c code of scanf he would have done this standard thing for char string + integer == start the string from int num ahead.. this would be a convention for char string + int in printf too i hope.. –  Ashish Negi Aug 24 '11 at 17:15
    
John: well that is like see what happens when you do this or that with code. Well i think that when somebody wrote the c code of scanf he would have done this standard thing for char string + integer == start the string from int num ahead.. is this a convention for char string + int in printf too ?? –  Ashish Negi Aug 26 '11 at 15:24
    
It has nothing to do with printf vs. scanf, but rather is intrinsic to C. Strings are just pointers to arrays of characters, and adding numbers to them skips that many characters (bytes) from the beginning. So yes, printf will behave similarly, as will any other function or expression. –  John Zwinck Aug 26 '11 at 21:44

Your code makes no sense.

You're adding the return value of the inner scanf to the address of the string passed to the outer scanf. Since scanf returns the number of items entered, this ends up adding 2 to the address, resulting in a string that starts two bytes (characters) later.

The inner scanf will run first.
Then, the outer scanf will run, with a shorter format string.

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