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I have written a small jQuery plugin with the following structure:

(function($) {
   // Private vars

   // Default settings
   $.PLUGINNAME = {
         id: 'PLUGINNAME',
         version: '1.0',
         defaults: {
              min: 0,
              max: 10
         }
   };

   // extend jQuery
   $.fn.extend({

       PLUGINNAME: function(_settings) {

           init = function() {

           }

           prepare = function() {

           }

           ...

           return this.each(function() {
                 _this = this;
                 init();
           });

       }

   });

})(jQuery);

I am calling this as follows:

$("#update-panel").PLUGINNAME({
                min: 1,
                max: 20  
          });

I am trying to provide an additional public method where some data inside the function can be updated after the above function call to the plugin and am not sure how to go about doing this. What I am looking for is something like this:

_PluginInstance = $("#update-panel").PLUGINNAME({
                    min: 1,
                    max: 20  
                   });
...
...
_PluginInstance.setMin(2); //should change the minimum to 2

setMin will probably use some of the plugin's internal variables so I am not understanding how to do this. I know I am not returning an instance of the plugin to do the above but can someone please tell me how to go about doing this by keeping the same plugin structure?

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just make the function a property of this within the PLUGINNAME object:

(function($) {
   $.PLUGINNAME = {
     // Default settings
   };

   // extend jQuery
   $.fn.extend({
       PLUGINNAME: function(_settings) {

           // private methods
           init = function() {};
           prepare = function() {};

           // public methods
           this.setMin = function ( val ) {
             _settings.min = val;
           };
           this.getMin = function () {
             return _settings.min;
           };

           return this.each(function() {
             _this = this;
             init();
           });
       }
   });
})(jQuery);

Then you could do:

_PluginInstance = $("#update-panel").PLUGINNAME({
                    min: 1,
                    max: 20  
                   });
_PluginInstance.getMin(); // 1
_PluginInstance.setMin(2);
_PluginInstance.getMin(); // 2
share|improve this answer
    
Actually... this one works perfect except that how can I access the prepare function inside my plugin from the setMin. –  Legend Aug 21 '11 at 3:57
    
Just call prepare(); –  mVChr Aug 21 '11 at 3:59
    
It complains with prepare is not a function when I check Firebug's console. –  Legend Aug 21 '11 at 4:01
    
Works for me: jsfiddle.net/SMSAz –  mVChr Aug 21 '11 at 4:02
    
My bad. It was my mistake (typo). Sorry about that. +1 for your time. –  Legend Aug 21 '11 at 4:03
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You could use the jQuery-UI method calling style:

$("#update-panel").PLUGINNAME('method', arguments...);

And then in your plugin:

PLUGINNAME: function(_settings, args) {
    if(!$.isPlainObject(_settings)) {
        // _settings (should) be the method name so
        // do what needs to be done to execute the method.
        return;
    }
    // Proceed as before.

You might want to use the arguments pseudo-array instead of the extra args parameter. You can store extra things in $(this).data('PLUGINNAME') inside your PLUGINNAME function if you need to attach internal data to your individual objects.

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beat me to what I was just writing up. Essentially $('#update-panel').PLUGINNAME('setMin', 2). This is a better alternative than cluttering up $.fn –  numbers1311407 Aug 21 '11 at 3:40
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Not a jQuery guy myself, and mu is too short's answer seems to be the right one. But I'd imagine you could also do like it says on jQuery's own docs and use the .data() method to store the min/max values.

In other words, make your code look for existing data on the elements, so the first time you call $('#update_panel').plugin({min:1, max:20}), it won't find any existing data, so it'll place those min/max values in an object and "save" them using .data().
Then, when you later call $('#update_panel').plugin({min:2}) your code finds the existing data, and updates the values.

Just an idea

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Both approaches would work. This is kinda nice in this situation as it's very simple. And as an added benefit, if say another matching element were added to the page in between calls, the new element would be newly initialized with the plugin while the rest were just reconfigured, which is kinda cool. The $(matcher).plugin('method', *args) pattern is more flexible though, as you could define any number of methods which did different things than simply init/reconfig. –  numbers1311407 Aug 21 '11 at 3:49
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You can define a variable just like you've defined a plugin.

$.fn.PLUGINNAME.someVariable = 4;

or if you prefer, just declare an empty variable outside the plugin and then add to it from inside the plugin

var someVariable;

(function($) {
   ... the plugin code
})(jQuery);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank You. Actually the setMin isn't just setting some variables (I guess its a misleading name. Sorry!). It needs to update a few divs that were setup by the plugin. These divs are actually stored inside the definition. –  Legend Aug 21 '11 at 3:38
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