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I have a sequence of functions that look very similar but for a single line, like the following two (but I have many more of them):

private static int HowManyHoursInTheFirstYear(IList<T> samples)
{
    DateTime firstDate = samples[0].Date;
    int count = 0;

    while (count < samples.Count && 
          samples[count].Date.Year == firstDate.Year)
    {
        count++;
    }

    return count;
}


private static int HowManyDaysInTheFirstMonth(IList<T> samples)
{
    DateTime firstDate = samples[0].Date;
    int count = 0;

    while (count < samples.Count && 
           samples[count].Date.Month == firstDate.Month) // <--- only change!
        count++;
    }

    return count;
}

I was thinking about using delegates to remove this repetition in code in some elegant way, that would have allowed me to invoke something like:

HowManyDaysInTheFirstPeriod(
    samples,
    delegate(DateTime d1, DateTime d2) { return d1.Month == d2.Month; });

thereby declaring a delegate like the following:

delegate bool DateComparer(DateTime first, DateTime second);

and where HowManyDaysInTheFirstPeriod whould be something like the following:

private static int HowManySamplesInFirstPeriod
    IList<T> samples,
    DateComparer comparer)
{
    DateTime firstDate = samples[0].Date;
    int count = 0;

    while (count < samples.Count && comparer())
    {
        count++;
    }
}

Unfortunately, the compiler complains that comparer needs two parameters.

I am relatively new to C# and hit a road-block here. How would you solve this?

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3  
BTW, for someone who says they're pretty new to C#, this is a very sensible use of delegates. Kudos to you for spotting the repetition and factoring it out into a delegate. –  John Feminella Apr 3 '09 at 12:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You're almost there! The comparer delegate parameter is just like any other function: You still need to pass the appropriate arguments to invoke it. In your case, that's going to mean this change:

while (count < samples.Count && comparer(samples[count].Date, firstDate))
{
    count++;
}

(Also, note that samples should probably be samples.Count, as I have written above.)

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You can do it a bit simpler. Simply provide the function a delegate which extracts whatever should be compared from a DateTime:

private static int HowManySamplesInFirstPeriod<T>
    IList<T> samples,
    Func<DateTime, int> f // a function which takes a DateTime, and returns some number
{
    DateTime firstDate = samples[0].Date;
    int count = 0;

    while (count < samples && f(samples[count].Date) == f(firstDate))
    {
        count++;
    }
}

and it can then be called as such:

HowManySamplesInFirstPeriod(samples, (dt) => dt.Year); // to get the year
HowManySamplesInFirstPeriod(samples, (dt) => dt.Month); // to get the month

The (dt) => dt.year syntax may be new to you, but it's a cleaner way of writing "an anonymous delegate which takes an object dt of some generic type, and returns dt.year". You could write an old-fashioned delegate instead, but this is nicer. :)

We can make it a bit more general than that though, by adding another generic type parameter:

private static int HowManySamplesInFirstPeriod<T, U>
    IList<T> samples,
    Func<DateTime, U> f // Let's generalize it a bit, since the function may return something other than int (some of the DateTime members return doubles, as I recall)

As usual though, LINQ provides a nicer still alternative:

private static int HowManySamplesInFirstPeriod<T>
    IList<T> samples,
    Func<DateTime, int> f)
{
  var firstVal = f(samples.First().Date);
  return samples.Count(dt => f(dt.Date) = firstVal)
}
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You need to pass the comparer the two dates in question. It's probably juts as simple as:

private static int HowManySamplesInFirstPeriod
    IList<T> samples,
    DateComparer comparer)
{
    DateTime firstDate = samples[0].Date;
    int count = 0;

    while (count < samples.Count 
           && comparer(samples[count].Date, firstDate))
    {
        count++;
    }
}

Or you may want to pass them the other way round (i.e. firstDate and then samples[count].Date).

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I think jalf's answer needs to be modified slightly to fit the original usage:

private static int HowManyHoursInTheFirstYear(IList<DateTime> samples, Func<DateTime, DateTime, bool> comparer) 
{ 
    DateTime firstDate = samples[0].Date; 
    int count = 0;
    while (count < samples.Count && comparer(samples[count], firstDate) ) {
        count++;
    } 
    return count; 
}

Call using:

HowManyDaysInTheFirstPeriod(samples, (d1, d2) = > { return d1.Month == d2.Month; });
HowManyDaysInTheFirstPeriod(samples, (d1, d2) = > { return d1.Year == d2.Year; });
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You need to pass the dates being compared to the delegate. So:

comparer(samples[count].Date, firstDate)
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