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How can i calculate day number from a unix-timestamp, in a mathematical way and without using any functions and in simple math formula.

1313905026 --> 8 (Today 08/21/2011)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no simple formula to do this. You would need to subtract the number of years (accounting for leap years) since the epoch, which would probably require a loop or a discrete calculation of some kind. Then use some type of loop to subtract out the number of seconds in each month for the current year. What you are left with is the number of seconds currently into the month.

I would do something like this.

x = ...//the number of seconds
year = 1970

while (x > /*one year*/){
 x = x - /*seconds in january, and march-december*/
 if(year % 4 == 0){
  x -= /*leapeay seconds in february*/
 }else{
  x -= /*regular seconds in february*/
 }
}

//Then something like this:

if(x > /*seconds in january*/){
 x -= /*seconds in january*/
}
if(x > /*seconds in february*/){
 x -= /*seconds in january*/
}

.
.
.

//After that just get the number of days from x seconds and you're set.

Edit

There might actually be some discrete calculation that can be used to put everything into one line without the use of loops. But it's tricky... The first thing that comes to mind to to find out how many years have passed since the epoch, however this cannot easily be done because of leap years. An approximation is a possibility but it could cause some error near the very beginning and endings of months... It's a good little puzzle. I'll continue to think about it and let you know if I find an answer.

Edit

Yea... so I do recommend using date functions for simplicity, but here is the answer in case anyone else needs it...

First let t be the current time in seconds.

Let F be the number of seconds in four years. That is three regular years and one leap year. That should be: 126230400.

Now if you take away all of the time contributed by F, you will get a remainder ... y.

So y = n % F.

There are several cases now: 1. y is less that one year 2. y is less than two years 3. y is less than three years and less than two months 4. y is less than three years and greater than two months 5. y is less than four years

Note that 1972 was a leap year, so if you count up by four from 1970, wherever you left off will be a leap year in two years.

let jan, feb, febLY, mar, may, ..., dec be the number of seconds in each month (you'd need to calculate it out).

d represents the day number of the current month and D represents the number of seconds in a day (86400). y represents the number of seconds in a regular year, and yLY represents the number of seconds in a leap year.

y = (t % F)
if(y < Y){
 if(y > jan){
  y -= jan
 }
 if(y > feb){
  y -= feb
 }
 .
 .
 .
 d = y % D
}
else if(y < 2 * y){
 y = y - Y
 if(y > jan){
  y -= jan
 }
 if(y > feb){
  y -= feb
 }
 .
 .
 .
 d = y % D
}
else if(y < 2 * y + yLY){
 y = y - 2 * Y
 if(y > jan){
  y -= jan
 }
 if(y > febLY){
  y -= febLY
 }
 .
 .
 .
 d = y % D
}
else{
 y = y - 2 * Y - yLY
 if(y > jan){
  y -= jan
 }
 if(y > feb){
  y -= feb
 }
 .
 .
 .
 d = y % D
}

And that's how it's done. I haven't tested it (it's just pseudo code atm) but it should work. It can be compressed farther using functions to get rid of repetition, and ternary operators to get rid of if statements. That being said, don't use this! Stick with existing date functions. Hopefully this will be a useful guide for someone who needs it for something low level and does not have access to date functions.

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Thank you, so i think its better to calculate it using DATE functions, because i want to place it in middle of a sql query. –  Aram Alipoor Aug 21 '11 at 5:05
    
Wait, I got it! Just hang on a sec and I'll post my answer above. –  Bizorke Aug 21 '11 at 5:21

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