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Let's say I have 1000 requests being received on our servers to update a single MySQL table. Deadlock issues occur inevitably in this situation. We have retried posting the transaction as recommended for deadlocks but they still occur.

We are thinking of coming up with an alternative solution below.

  1. Create Table A, B, C.
  2. Write Requests coming to the server to update Table D, into A or B or C.
  3. Create an INSERT trigger on Tables A, B and C respectively that will in turn write the data in Table D instead of directly exposing Table D to the 1000 requests coming to the server.

So our question is when this happens and multiple rows gets written into Table A, B and C the underlying Triggers on Tables A, B and C might fire at the same time to update Table D.

Does MySQL InnoDB engine automatically queue these triggers or should we have to handle this in our code?

Any help is much appreciated.

Table D that is being updated directly by all these requests now and where the deadlock occurs looks like this.

v_user_email    varchar(60) NO  PRI     
v_device_IMEI   varchar(40) NO  PRI     
i_adid          int(11)         NO  PRI     
i_impressions   int(4)          YES 0   
dt_pulllogdttm  datetime    NO          
c_created_by    char(15)    NO          
dt_created_on   datetime    NO          
c_modified_by   char(15)    YES         
dt_modified_on  datetime    YES 

PHP that inserts / updates rows in this table looks like this below. You will see that we try posting the transaction 3 times if it fails due to deadlock but there are transactions that fail even then and the log says due to deadlock.

$updateQuery = "UPDATE tb_ad_pull_log SET i_impressions = (i_impressions + 1), dt_pulllogdttm = SYSDATE(), c_modified_by = '$createdBy', dt_modified_on = SYSDATE() WHERE v_user_email = '$email' AND i_adid = $adId";
        if(ExecuteDeadLockQuery($updateQuery, "UPDATE", __LINE__) == 0) // If there is no record for this ad for the user, insert a new record
        {
            $insertQuery = "INSERT INTO tb_ad_pull_log VALUES('$email', '$device_IMEI', $adId, 1, SYSDATE(), '$createdBy', SYSDATE(), NULL, NULL)";
            ExecuteDeadLockQuery($insertQuery, "INSERT", __LINE__);
        }    

ExecuteDeadLockQuery function looks like this -

function ExecuteDeadLockQuery($query, $activity, $lineNumber)
    {
        global $errorLoggingPath;
        $maxAttempts = 3;
        $currentTry = 1;
        $noOfAffectedRows = -1;

        while($currentTry <= $maxAttempts)
        {
            $currentTry++;

            mysql_query($query);

            if( mysql_errno() <> 0 ) // If error occured
            {
                continue;
            }
            else
            {
                $noOfAffectedRows = mysql_affected_rows();
                break;
            }           
        }

        if($noOfAffectedRows == -1) // Query never executed successfully
        {
            LogError($activity . " failed in tb_ad_pull_log: " . mysql_error(), __FILE__, $lineNumber , $errorLoggingPath);
        }

        return $noOfAffectedRows;
    }

Is there a cleaner way to avoid this deadlock? Here are some logs that we have.

ERROR:  08-21-2011 14:09:57  UPDATE failed in tb_ad_pull_log: Deadlock found when trying to get lock; try restarting transaction    LINE  83
ERROR:  08-21-2011 14:09:57  INSERT failed in tb_ad_pull_log: Deadlock found when trying to get lock; try restarting transaction    LINE  86
ERROR:  08-21-2011 14:09:57  INSERT failed in tb_ad_pull_log: Deadlock found when trying to get lock; try restarting transaction    LINE  86
ERROR:  08-21-2011 14:09:57  UPDATE failed in tb_ad_pull_log: Deadlock found when trying to get lock; try restarting transaction   LINE  83
ERROR:  08-21-2011 14:09:57  INSERT failed in tb_ad_pull_log: Deadlock found when trying to get lock; try restarting transaction    LINE  86
ERROR:  08-21-2011 14:09:57  UPDATE failed in tb_ad_pull_log: Deadlock found when trying to get lock; try restarting transaction    LINE  83
ERROR:  08-21-2011 14:09:59  UPDATE failed in tb_ad_pull_log: Deadlock found when trying to get lock; try restarting transaction    LINE  83
ERROR:  08-21-2011 14:09:59  UPDATE failed in tb_ad_pull_log: Deadlock found when trying to get lock; try restarting transaction    LINE  83
ERROR:  08-21-2011 14:10:01  UPDATE failed in tb_ad_pull_log: Deadlock found when trying to get lock; try restarting transaction    LINE  83
ERROR:  08-21-2011 14:10:01  INSERT failed in tb_ad_pull_log: Deadlock found when trying to get lock; try restarting transaction    LINE  86

Line 83 is the UPDATE statement in the PHP and 86 is the INSERT. Please keep in mind that this data can be written into this table at the rate of 5-8 transactions per second.

Additional info

With every INSERT and UPDATE into TABLE D a trigger executes that updates TABLE X and TABLE Y. Is this a reason for Table D to remain locked and hence the incoming requests gets a deadlock?

Finally got the problem but I am not sure how to solve it. The AFTER INSERT and AFTER UPDATE triggers on TABLE D locks the table when they are triggered and hence the incoming requests deadlock. Why I am so sure of this is because once I dropped these triggers the log stopped logging deadlock messages logged otherwise

Snippet of the Trigger code.

    CREATE DEFINER=CURRENT_USER TRIGGER tuadmin.t_update_CPM_updateBalance
AFTER UPDATE
ON tb_ad_pull_log
FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN

    DECLARE `cpm_value` decimal(10,4);
    DECLARE `clientid` int(4);

    /* Execute the below block if the requested ad is not the default ad */
    IF NEW.i_adid <> 1 THEN

        SET SESSION TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL READ COMMITTED;
            //do updates to TABLE X and Y logic
END

This is where I do not understand why would these triggers hold a lock on Table D and not let any insert/update happen concurrently.

Will this avoid all problems if we drop the triggers and just call a SP from the PHP to do the work?

share|improve this question
    
what are your transactions look like? In order to have deadlock, you should have more than 1 transaction, which already updated a row and tries to update second row, but that row was updated by another transaction. Simle inserts, as well as updates on 1 row only, won't cause deadlock. Maybe you need to order by / limit your update queries? –  Darhazer Aug 21 '11 at 9:20
    
@Darhazer updated question with details of the transactions. Your help is much appreciated. –  Aakash Aug 21 '11 at 16:36
    
do you have index on v_user_email / i_adid . If not, that's causing a deadlock, cause the update query have to scan all the records –  Darhazer Aug 21 '11 at 16:39
    
@Darhazer v_user_email/v_device_IMEI/i_adid are primary keys for the table –  Aakash Aug 21 '11 at 16:42
    
Do you have multiple queries for the same email? As you may know, the order of fields in a BTree index matters, so the index can be used for the i_adid lookup because IMEI is not provided, and the query have to lock all the records for the given user. I'm digging into this because deadlock when working with only 1 table is rare situation and should be possible to avoid with just optimizing the query. –  Darhazer Aug 21 '11 at 16:47

3 Answers 3

Ok, so you're using a single table, and a few triggers ?

And you have only very few transactions per second ?

And you have weird locking issues ?

Use PostgreSQL, i'm quite sure of the following : a) It will not have those problems b) If it has them, you'll have community support in no time

There is 99.99% of chances that your problem is caused by VERY_SLOW_TRIGGERS, I mean like totally hugely very slow, because only 8 per second implies a transaction running time of 125ms which is .. huge.

The reason for the lock is evident, you are calling a trigger on the table D.

-> call modification on table D
 -> before mod trigger
 -> modification
 -> after mod trigger
-> modification complete

I.E. everything that happens in your trigger is part of the transaction on table D, and will thus keep the lock until it's finished.

You can either :

a) lock less rows

b) lock less time -> insert into another table, process async from there

c) use a rdbms that supports triggers properly

The balancing option is the hammer-vs-fly option, there is no reason you would need more than one server for such low tps count.

However, you should troubleshoot the performance of your trigger and verify that you're not running into I/O congestion somewhere (usually that which is unnecessarily slow tends to also overuse precious resources).

Alright, here's another option :

UNLOCK TABLES explicitly releases any table locks held by the current session.

IF your last action is that update / insert AND IF your trigger failing is either IMPOSSIBLE or NOT AN ISSUE

Then you could use this at the beginning of your trigger, releasing all locks and asking only for the non-locking consistent read.

share|improve this answer

update and insert in mysql blocked and syncronized opration,assume that you have 2 request is coming from 2 trigger for updating table D ,when 1 is updating table D second is waited on queue.for select there has no syncronized block 2 thread can request at same time.if you want to make this possible same time transaction you should build replication

share|improve this answer

In this case what MYSQL DBAs use to have is a feature called "replication", that is divide a single server into many servers as needed to balancing loads. You can do that using a single powerful hardware, divided into 2 or more virtual servers running inside virtual appliances with VirtualBox, VirtualPC, or your virtualization flavor, with MYSQL replication feature enabled.

You can tune a single server for writes (your updates in this case) and other servers for queries that reads data. See MYSQL replication documentation here

share|improve this answer

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