Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Well, here is the thing:

I have the following Haskell code, this one:

[ (a, b, c) | c <- [1..10], b <- [1..10], a <- [1..10], a ^ 2 + b ^ 2 == c ^ 2 ]

Which will returns

[(4,3,5),(3,4,5),(8,6,10),(6,8,10)]

For those who aren't familiar with this, I'll explain:

  • It returns a tuple (a,b,c), where each of these "definitions" (a,b,c) receive a list (1 up to 10) and his members are compared by the a ^ 2 + b ^ 2 == c ^ 2 ? expression (each member).

How can I do the same (one line if possible) in Python/Ruby?

P.S.: they are compared in lexicographical order.

share|improve this question
2  
This can also be archieved by filter (\(a,b,c) -> a^2+b^2==c^2) $ (,,) <$> [1..10] <*> [1..10] <*> [1..10] –  FUZxxl Aug 21 '11 at 10:55
    
@FUZxxl Nice piece of code.. –  isakkarlsson Aug 21 '11 at 14:43
    
@isakkarlsson applicative style FTW! –  FUZxxl Aug 21 '11 at 14:44
1  
Cool question. I definitely appreciate learning the Haskellish side of Python and Ruby. –  Dan Burton Aug 22 '11 at 4:41

5 Answers 5

It's possible in Python with one long line and with no import. Python's list comprehensions can be used with multiple variables:

>>> [ (a, b, c) for c in range(1, 11) for b in range(1, 11) for a in range(1, 11) if a*a + b*b == c*c ]
[(4, 3, 5), (3, 4, 5), (8, 6, 10), (6, 8, 10)]
share|improve this answer

Ruby solution:

(1..10).to_a.repeated_permutation(3).select { |a, b, c| a*a + b*b == c*c }
# => [[3, 4, 5], [4, 3, 5], [6, 8, 10], [8, 6, 10]] 
share|improve this answer

Python solution, using itertools.product, which is equivalent to nested for-loops in a generator expression:

[(a,b,c) for c,b,a in product(range(1,11), repeat=3) if a*a + b*b == c*c]
share|improve this answer
4  
product(range(1, 11), repeat = 3) –  agf Aug 21 '11 at 8:12
    
Good call, that is nicer. –  zeekay Aug 21 '11 at 8:15

A Ruby alternative without forcing identical ranges:

>> (1..10).to_a.product((1..10).to_a, (1..10).to_a).select { |a, b, c| a*a + b*b == c*c }
#=> [[3, 4, 5], [4, 3, 5], [6, 8, 10], [8, 6, 10]]

You can argue that this does not return the expected result, that's because you use c->b->a to iterate but return (a, b, c). So I am afraid in Ruby, having no list-comprehensions, we need to do something like this (map_select=map+compact):

>> (1..10).to_a.product((1..10).to_a, (1..10).to_a).map { |c, b, a| [a, b, c] if a*a + b*b == c*c }.compact
 #=> [[4, 3, 5], [3, 4, 5], [8, 6, 10], [6, 8, 10]]

Not vanilla Ruby, but using the cool library lazylist you can write:

>> list { [a, b, c] }.where(:c => (1..10), :b => (1..10), :a => (1..10)) { a*a + b*b == c*c }.to_a
#=> [[4, 3, 5], [3, 4, 5], [8, 6, 10], [6, 8, 10]]
share|improve this answer
1  
I prefer this variant as it reflects the original code more closely, although is longer. –  Mladen Jablanović Aug 21 '11 at 7:47
    
I prefer this variant too; it comes closer to the original in Haskell. –  luizfonseca Aug 21 '11 at 8:02
(for [a (range 1 11)
  b (range 1 11)
  c (range 1 11) :when (=
                        (+ (* a a) (* b b))
                        (* c c))]
  [a b c])

A clojure example of the same.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.