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As an example, I'd like to serialize/deserialize one object of Slick2d's Animation class using Jackson. What is the simplest way to do this?

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Why was my question edited to have Americanised spelling? –  Mitch Aug 28 '11 at 8:50

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can annotate a mix-in interface if you want to control the generated json on third party classes.

read more here: http://wiki.fasterxml.com/JacksonMixInAnnotations

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This has worked well so far, thank you. I'll wait until I get a response from @Bozho regarding the alternative before I set the answer though, as the other way requires far less effort. –  Mitch Aug 22 '11 at 9:08
    
I've now encountered a problem on writing objects to JSON, where Jackson serialises every field that it can. This leads to stack overflows for some classes and massive dumps of binary data in others. Is there a simpler way than @JsonIgnoreing every getter/field? –  Mitch Aug 22 '11 at 12:23
    
I think I've found the solution to that, though I'm not sure if there's a way to disable auto-detection bar a few fields... –  Mitch Aug 22 '11 at 12:27

Just as any object - pass it to objectMapper.readValue(..) / objectMapper.writeValue(..)

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Wow, trying to write code in a comment really sucks on this site. Forget that... The Animation constructor that I'm interested in takes two arguments: an array of Image objects (which takes a String named ref in its constructor) named frames and an integer named duration. I wrote a unit test to try it out: http://pastebin.com/9F7uZQjX Also, here is the Image documentation to show the Image constructors. –  Mitch Aug 22 '11 at 8:02
    
Mix-ins annotations can be used to denote constructor to use, if that helps. Sometimes custom deserializers are simplest way, for most exotic third-party types. –  StaxMan Aug 22 '11 at 22:39

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