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(I've edited this for clarity, and changed the actual question a bit based on EOL's answer) I'm trying to translate the following function in C to Python but failing miserably (see C code below). As I understand it, it takes four 1-byte chars starting from the memory location pointed to by from, treats them as unsigned long ints in order to give each one 4 bytes of space, and does some bitshifting to arrange them as a big-endian 32-bit integer. It's then used in an algorithm of checking file validity. (from the Treaty of Babel)

static int32 read_alan_int(unsigned char *from)
{
 return ((unsigned long int) from[3])| ((unsigned long int)from[2] << 8) |
       ((unsigned long int) from[1]<<16)| ((unsigned long int)from[0] << 24);
}
/*
  The claim algorithm for Alan files is:
   * For Alan 3, check for the magic word
   * load the file length in blocks
   * check that the file length is correct
   * For alan 2, each word between byte address 24 and 81 is a
      word address within the file, so check that they're all within
      the file
   * Locate the checksum and verify that it is correct
*/
static int32 claim_story_file(void *story_file, int32 extent)
{
 unsigned char *sf = (unsigned char *) story_file;
 int32 bf, i, crc=0;
 if (extent < 160) return INVALID_STORY_FILE_RV;
 if (memcmp(sf,"ALAN",4))
 { /* Identify Alan 2.x */
 bf=read_alan_int(sf+4);
 if (bf > extent/4) return INVALID_STORY_FILE_RV;
 for (i=24;i<81;i+=4)
 if (read_alan_int(sf+i) > extent/4) return INVALID_STORY_FILE_RV;
 for (i=160;i<(bf*4);i++)
 crc+=sf[i];
 if (crc!=read_alan_int(sf+152)) return INVALID_STORY_FILE_RV;
 return VALID_STORY_FILE_RV;
 }
 else
 { /* Identify Alan 3 */
   bf=read_alan_int(sf+12);
   if (bf > (extent/4)) return INVALID_STORY_FILE_RV;
   for (i=184;i<(bf*4);i++)
    crc+=sf[i];
 if (crc!=read_alan_int(sf+176)) return INVALID_STORY_FILE_RV;

 }
 return INVALID_STORY_FILE_RV;
}

I'm trying to reimplement this in Python. For implementing the read_alan_int function, I would think that importing struct and doing struct.unpack_from('>L', data, offset) would work. However, on valid files, this always returns 24 for the value bf, which means that the for loop is skipped.

def read_alan_int(file_buffer, i):
    i0 = ord(file_buffer[i]) * (2 ** 24)
    i1 = ord(file_buffer[i + 1]) * (2 ** 16)
    i2 = ord(file_buffer[i + 2]) * (2 ** 8)
    i3 = ord(file_buffer[i + 3])
    return i0 + i1 + i2 + i3

def is_a(file_buffer):
    crc = 0
    if len(file_buffer) < 160:
        return False
    if file_buffer[0:4] == 'ALAN':
        # Identify Alan 2.x
        bf = read_alan_int(file_buffer, 4)
        if bf > len(file_buffer)/4:
            return False
        for i in range(24, 81, 4):
            if read_alan_int(file_buffer, i) > len(file_buffer)/4:
                return False
        for i in range(160, bf * 4):
            crc += ord(file_buffer[i])
        if crc != read_alan_int(file_buffer, 152):
            return False
        return True
    else:
        # Identify Alan 3.x
        #bf = read_long(file_buffer, 12, '>')
        bf = read_alan_int(file_buffer, 12)
        print bf
        if bf > len(file_buffer)/4:
            return False
        for i in range(184, bf * 4):
            crc += ord(file_buffer[i])
        if crc != read_alan_int(file_buffer, 176):
            return False
        return True
    return False


if __name__ == '__main__':
    import sys, struct
    data = open(sys.argv[1], 'rb').read()
    print is_a(data)

...but the damn thing still returns 24. Unfortunately, my C skills are non-existent so I'm having trouble getting the original program to print some debug output so I can know what bf is supposed to be.

What am I doing wrong?


Ok, so I'm apparently doing read_alan_int correctly. However, what's failing for me is the check that the first 4 characters are "ALAN". All of my test files fail this test. I've changed the code to remove this if/else statement and to instead just take advantage of early returns, and now all of my unit tests pass. So, on a practical level, I'm done. However, I'll keep the question open to address the new problem: how can I possibly wrangle the bits to get "ALAN" out of the first 4 chars?

def is_a(file_buffer):
    crc = 0
    if len(file_buffer) < 160:
        return False
    #if file_buffer.startswith('ALAN'):
        # Identify Alan 2.x
    bf = read_long(file_buffer, 4)
    if bf > len(file_buffer)/4:
        return False
    for i in range(24, 81, 4):
        if read_long(file_buffer, i) > len(file_buffer)/4:
            return False
    for i in range(160, bf * 4):
        crc += ord(file_buffer[i])
    if crc == read_long(file_buffer, 152):
        return True
    # Identify Alan 3.x
    crc = 0
    bf = read_long(file_buffer, 12)
    if bf > len(file_buffer)/4:
        return False
    for i in range(184, bf * 4):
        crc += ord(file_buffer[i])
    if crc == read_long(file_buffer, 176):
        return True
    return False
share|improve this question
    
We don't know what your Python code looks like, other than that one function. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 21 '11 at 10:10
    
Ah sorry, I added my Python file validity-checking code. –  user626998 Aug 21 '11 at 10:28
    
You haven't added your file-reading code. Also show us what print map(ord, file_buffer[12:16]) produces. Can you make the C code and/or a sample file available? –  John Machin Aug 21 '11 at 10:46
    
print map(ord, file_buffer[12:16]) prints out [0, 0, 0, 24] –  user626998 Aug 21 '11 at 11:15
    
Also, not sure if this is significant, but if you let foo = lambda n: struct.unpack_from('>L', file_buffer, n), foo(12) * 2**24 == foo(13) * 2**16 == foo(14) * 2**8 == foo(15) –  user626998 Aug 21 '11 at 11:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ah, I think I've got it. Note that the description says

/*
  The claim algorithm for Alan files is:
   * For Alan 3, check for the magic word
   * load the file length in blocks
   * check that the file length is correct
   * For alan 2, each word between byte address 24 and 81 is a
      word address within the file, so check that they're all within
      the file
   * Locate the checksum and verify that it is correct
*/

which I read as saying that there's a magic word in Alan 3, but not in Alan 2. However, your code goes the other way, even though the C code only assumes that the ALAN exists for Alan 3 files.

Why? Because you don't speak C, so you guessed -- naturally enough! -- that memcmp would return (the equivalent of a Python) True if the first four characters of sf and "ALAN" are equal.. but it doesn't. memcmp returns 0 if the contents are equal, and nonzero if they differ.

And that seems to be the way it works:

>>> import urllib2
>>> 
>>> alan2 = urllib2.urlopen("http://ifarchive.plover.net/if-archive/games/competition2001/alan/chasing/chasing.acd").read(4)
>>> alan3 = urllib2.urlopen("http://mirror.ifarchive.org/if-archive/games/competition2006/alan/enterthedark/EnterTheDark.a3c").read(4)
>>> 
>>> alan2
'\x02\x08\x01\x00'
>>> alan3
'ALAN'
share|improve this answer
    
Ahhhhh fantastic, thanks! Yes, that's exactly the problem. I've encountered memcmp a few times so far and I keep having to actively remind myself of how it works. –  user626998 Aug 21 '11 at 17:15
    
@DSM: Congratulations! –  EOL Aug 24 '11 at 6:31
    
So, naturally enough, C's memcmp() is equivalent to Python's cmp(). :) –  EOL Aug 24 '11 at 6:35

Hypothesis 1: You are running on Windows, and you haven't opened your file in binary mode.

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm in Linux and I am opening it in binary format anyway. –  user626998 Aug 21 '11 at 11:14
    
@Brandon Invergo: Based on the fact that you had not stated which OS and hadn't shown all of your code, a hypotheses that you were on/in Windows was quite justifiable. The correct response was "Sorry I didn't include all the relevant information". Is one of the downvotes yours? –  John Machin Aug 21 '11 at 23:35
    
@John Machin: upvoted because your suggestion was arguably a potential solution to the original question. –  EOL Aug 22 '11 at 7:26
    
@John Machin: you're right, I originally framed the question poorly and with not enough information. At the time I guess I felt like your response would be better as a comment to get more info out of me but now I agree that, in the original situation, yes it could have been a valid answer. Unfortunately I can only remove my downvote if you make some sort of edit to your response (the system won't let me). Sorry about that... –  user626998 Aug 22 '11 at 7:52
    
@Brandon Invergo: edited. –  John Machin Aug 22 '11 at 20:44

Your Python version looks fine to me.

PS: I missed the "memcmp() catch" that DSM found, so the Python code for if memcmp(…)… should actually be `if file_buffer[0:4] != 'ALAN'.

As far as I can see from the C code and from the sample file you give in the comments to the original question, the sample file is indeed invalid; here are the values:

read_alan_int(sf+12) == 24  # 0, 0, 0, 24 in file sf, big endian
crc = 0
read_alan_int(sf+176) = 46  # 0, 0, 0, 46 in file sf, big endian

So, crc != read_alan_int(sf+176), indeed.

Are you sure that the sample file is a valid file? Or is part of the calculation of crc missing from the original post??

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, good to hear that I'm not going crazy at least. I ran the code on the 8 files I have of this type on my computer and they all have 24 in that position. Here's the funny thing (well, not funny, the thing that will make asking this question probably dumb): if I only use the first block in the if file_buffer[0:4] == 'ALAN'...else... block, the files all pass. So this means that for some reason they're not correctly entering the if statement and skipping straight to the else. I'm now working out what I did wrong in that regard. –  user626998 Aug 21 '11 at 12:58
    
print repr(file_buffer[0:4]) gives \x02\x08\x01\x00, which I think almost certainly doesn't spell "ALAN"... –  user626998 Aug 21 '11 at 13:09
    
@Brandon Invergo: ALAN would indeed be \x41\x4c\x41\x4e, so it's normal that the else clause be executed. Can you run the C code on the files and see whether it says that the example file is valid? –  EOL Aug 22 '11 at 7:23

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