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I know, this is often discussed. But after searching around like someone out of the 19th century, I need some advice. I have no problem by declaring a "namespace", but when it comes to a prototype.foo function, I stuck. I found a way, but I don't like it:

Namespace = {}
Namespace.obj = function() {
    this.foo="bar";
}
Namespace.obj.prototype.start = function() {
    this.foo="fubar";
}

blah = new Namespace.obj();
blah.start();

Now, since I'm a little neurotic in case of scripting, I would like to have something like this:

Namespace = {
    obj: function() {
        this.foo="bar";
    },
    obj.prototype.start: function(tabinst) {
        this.foo="fubar";
    }
}
...

But then it throws an error: "Uncaught SyntaxError: Unexpected token ."

I know, this is cosmetic, but I think that there has to be a better method of declaring a "namespace" containing a class and prototype functions.

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2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The way I would do it is using the "Module pattern".
You basically encapsulate all your "Module" logic in a self executing function that would return an object having your classes, functions, variables etc... Think of the return value as exposing your Module API.

Namespace = (function () {
    /** Class obj **/
    var obj = function () {
        this.foo = 'bar';
    };
    obj.prototype = {
        start: function () {
            this.foo = 'fubar';
        }
    };

    /** Class obj2 **/  
    var obj2 = function () {
        this.bar = 'foo'
    };
    obj2.prototype = {
        start: function () {
            this.bar = 'barfoo';
        },
        end: function () {
            this.bar = '';
        }
    };
    return {
        obj : obj,
        obj2: obj2
    };
})();

var o = new Namespace.obj()
o.start()

In order to further encapsulate the "obj" class methods and constructor we could do the following:

/** Class obj **/
var obj = (function () {
    /** class Constructor **/
    var obj = function () {
        this.foo = 'bar';
    };
    /** class methods **/
    obj.prototype = {
        start: function () {
            this.foo = 'fubar';
        }
    };
    return obj;
})();

There is also an important feature that comes for free using this pattern, which is "Private variables", consider the following:

/** Class Foo **/
var Foo = (function () {
    // Private variables
    var private_number = 200
    /** class Constructor **/
    var Foo = function () {
        this.bar = 0;
    };
    /** class methods **/
    Foo.prototype = {
        add: function () {
            this.bar += private_number;
        }
    };
    return Foo;
})();

foo = new Foo();
alert(foo.bar); // 0
foo.add(); 
alert(foo.bar);// 200
alert(foo.private_number) //undefined
share|improve this answer
    
Nice approach, +1. –  Jiri Aug 21 '11 at 12:25
    
Thans Amjad, this is great. But now I'm stumbling again. Do I see it right: With this approach it's not possible to make a Namespace.blah() function that is detached form obj? –  Johnny Sterlak Aug 21 '11 at 14:52
1  
@Johnny If I understand your question right, just add a blah function to the return object: . . return { obj : obj, obj2: obj2, blah: function () {/* do something */} }; –  Amjad Masad Aug 22 '11 at 9:43
    
Amjad, thanks a lot. This is exactly what I wanted! Now I got it. –  Johnny Sterlak Aug 22 '11 at 10:44
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Yes because, you cannot use this type of chaining in an object declaration

obj.prototype or obj.something here, because the language sees obj as a non-object value. You can fake such an effect like this

Namespace = {};

Namespace.obj =function() {
        this.foo="bar";
};

Namespace.obj.prototype.start = function(tabinst) {
        this.foo="fubar";
};

console.log( Namespace.obj.prototype );

(see this fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/WewnF/ )

EDIT: Wow, I just noticed that what I said was already within the question. I 'm so sorry did not notice that sooner... Well the way you described yourself is the correct method of achieving this.

Otherwise you can re-write your code like this - but is not exactly what you 're after and won't work the same (since obj won't be a function itself and you will have to call its main function like this obj.main(); )

Namespace = {
    obj: {
          main : function() {
               this.foo="bar";
          },
          prototype : {
             start: function(tabinst) {
             this.foo="fubar";
             }
          }
    }
}

EDIT 2: See this fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/NmA3v/1/

Namespace = {
    obj: function() {
        this.foo="bar";
    },
    prototype: {
        obj : {
            start : function( hi ) {
                 alert( hi ); 
            }  
        }

    },

    initProto : function(){
        for( var key in Namespace )
        {
            if( key !== "prototype" )
            {
                for( var jey in Namespace.prototype[ key ] )
                    Namespace[ key ].prototype[ jey ] =  Namespace.prototype[ key ][ jey ];  
            }
        }
    }
}

Namespace.initProto();

console.log( Namespace.obj);

var test  = new Namespace.obj();

test.start( "Hello World" );

This will have the exact same effect. Explanation : we are declaring our objects as normal properties-functions, and then use a master prototype object which containers objects with the same names as above, for example for each Namespace.obj, there is also a Namespace.prototype.obj which contains the functions we want to add in the prototype chain.

then with namespace.protoInit(), we iterate through all properties - and extract the functions from the Namespace.prototype[ key ] and add them to Namespace[ key ].prototype - succesfully extending the prototype object! A bit unorthodox, but works!

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The first snippet in your edit will not work as you might think. obj.main and obj.prototype are two different independent functions. Yes, this will refer to the same object if you call them without new, but only because it refers to window. So you will make foo global. –  Felix Kling Aug 21 '11 at 12:28
    
Your second example limits Namespace to only contain one "class" which somehow defeats the purpose of the namespace. –  Felix Kling Aug 21 '11 at 12:33
    
You are correct for the first example, and I feel stupid for not noticing this sooner, but I disagree about the second one. Why does it limit it to only one "class" ? If you use more objects, it will iterate through them and assign to them the correct prototype values. –  Pantelis Aug 21 '11 at 12:46
    
Ah true, you have obj inside prototype.... I missed that. Sorry for that. I would still say this is not a straightforward approach. –  Felix Kling Aug 21 '11 at 12:49
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