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To my shame, I can't figure out how to handle exception for python 'with' statement. If I have a code:

with open("a.txt") as f:
    print f.readlines()

I really want to handle 'file not found exception' in order to do somehing. But I can't write

with open("a.txt") as f:
    print f.readlines()
except:
    print 'oops'

and can't write

with open("a.txt") as f:
    print f.readlines()
else:
    print 'oops'

enclosing 'with' in a try/except statement doesn't work else: exception is not raised. What can I do in order to process failure inside 'with' statement in a Pythonic way?

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2  
Please, don't put an extra space before colon - it looks ugly and contradicts to PEP-8 (see section "Whitespace in Expressions and Statements") –  Eugene Morozov Apr 4 '09 at 8:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 66 down vote accepted
from __future__ import with_statement

try:
    with open( "a.txt" ) as f :
        print f.readlines()
except EnvironmentError: # parent of IOError, OSError *and* WindowsError where available
    print 'oops'

If you want different handling for errors from the open call vs the working code you could do:

try:
    f = open('foo.txt')
except IOError:
    print('error')
else:
    with f:
        print f.readlines()
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, it was a method redifinition bug ^_^. Actually works. –  Eye of Hell Apr 3 '09 at 13:30
1  
Could also generate an OSError. –  Markus Jarderot Apr 3 '09 at 13:37
1  
MizardX: it also can generate a WindowsError, ergo the edit :) –  tzot Apr 3 '09 at 20:07
    
Looks good to me... –  Douglas Leeder Apr 3 '09 at 20:30
    
ΤΖΩΤΖΙΟΥ: WindowsError is a subclass of OSError. But EnvironmentError will do. –  Markus Jarderot Apr 5 '09 at 0:11

The best "Pythonic" way to do this, exploiting the with statement, is listed as Example #6 in PEP 343, which gives the background of the statement.

@contextmanager
def opened_w_error(filename, mode="r"):
    try:
        f = open(filename, mode)
    except IOError, err:
        yield None, err
    else:
        try:
            yield f, None
        finally:
            f.close()

Used as follows:

with opened_w_error("/etc/passwd", "a") as (f, err):
    if err:
        print "IOError:", err
    else:
        f.write("guido::0:0::/:/bin/sh\n")
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3  
I like it but it feels like a little too much black magic. Its not entirely explicit for the reader –  Paul Seeb Jul 9 '12 at 19:09
    
@PaulSeeb Why wouldn't you define it and save yourself from doing it each time you need to? It's defined at your application level, and it's as magic as any other contextmanager. I think someone using the with statement would understand it clearly (the name of the function might also be more expressive if you don't like it). The "with" statement itself has been engineered to work this way, to define a "secure" block of code and delegate checking functions to context managers (to make the code more clear). –  user765144 Jul 16 '12 at 17:45

This code works fine in python 2.5.1:

from __future__ import with_statement

try:
    with open('non-existent.txt') as f:
        print f.readlines()
except:
    print "Exception"
share|improve this answer
10  
-1: bare except is always a bad idea, this really shouldn't be given as example to a newbie. –  nosklo Apr 3 '09 at 20:34

I just tried, enclosing the with in a try/except works fine.

try:
  with open("dummy.txt", "r") as f:
    print(f.readlines())
except:
  print("oops")
share|improve this answer
11  
-1: bare except is always a bad idea, this really shouldn't be given as example to a newbie. –  nosklo Apr 3 '09 at 20:34

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