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Say I am requiring a user to input the certain words provided and he/will just input it on a textbox which will be validated regardless of order.I have been looking for answers for hours and I'm stuck :/

e.g. the words should be inputted are: foo, bar, green.

and I can still match it even if the order is bar green foo or green foo bar

I pretty much know the very basics of regex but I don't know how to match with this type of condition.. Any answers will be much appreciated!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This checks if you have exactly these three words in the input and nothing more:

/^(?=.*\bbar\b)(?=.*\bgreen\b)(?=.*\bfoo\b)(?:\s*\b\w+\b\s*){3}$/s
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Thanks this seems to work.. But I have one question in mind. I see that they are somehow made in order of bar - green - foo. But how was this achieved. Recursively? –  Rei Aug 21 '11 at 12:37
    
@Rei Not recursively. Firstly it checks if there is a word bar in the string, then it checks for word green, later for word foo and finally it checks if there are 3 words in a string. –  Karolis Aug 21 '11 at 12:44
    
@Rei you can reed about lookahead assertions more here: regular-expressions.info/lookaround.html –  Karolis Aug 21 '11 at 12:45
    
Thank you very much!!! –  Rei Aug 21 '11 at 12:49

simple answer: don't use regex.

Just explode() the input, and then check manually if the words are ok. A simple way to check if the input is good is this:

if(!array_diff(explode(' ', $input), $valid_words)) {
    // input OK
}
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I would have to agree with your statement but I will also make use of the hints not just based on my query. It may not be that ideal but it may come in handy. Thanks :) –  Rei Aug 21 '11 at 12:27
    
@Rei still, using regex to do that is not good. It can be done, but it leads to very weird abominations like @Karolis's. If you want more flexible delimiters you can get the words from the string by using a regex like \w+, and then use my solution to see if the input is ok. –  Gabi Purcaru Aug 21 '11 at 12:34

use explode()

http://sandbox.phpcode.eu/g/59c57

<?php 
$str = 'foo, bar, green'; 
$array = explode(',', $str); 
print_r($array);
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@GabiPurcaru: edited. –  genesis Aug 21 '11 at 12:19

This regular expression will check if you have those words in your input:

(?=^.*?foo.*$)(?=^.*?bar.*$)(?=^.*?green.*$)^.*$

But it does not check if it does not have anything else. In general, I agree to others don't use regular expressions for this thing. Split the input and check against your dictionary.

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1  
This will also work with fool barman in greenland :) –  Karolis Aug 21 '11 at 12:32
    
That's what I said as well in my answer –  Andrey Adamovich Aug 21 '11 at 12:38

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